Jump to content

Appaloosa


Guest AdminGuyX

Recommended Posts

Welcome to Appaloosa

 

I will definitely be seeing this movie!

Link to post
Share on other sites
http://movies.yahoo.com/movie/1809942136/video

 

Fair warning, the clips and the trailer are a bit "spoilery".

 

I can't wait to see this one.

 

Like a kid waiting for Christmas!!

 

Quite a few clips on this yahoo page, so I figured I'd share it.

 

Anybody read the book?

 

Yep, I read the book and the sequel to it called REDEMPTION. Both great reads. There is a 3rd and final book comimg out soon, the realease date escapes me, but I'll find it. I posted up a ton of pics and comments on the books over in the western thread. Every thing I have seen so far indicates that the movie script has really taken a lot of the book to heart. To me this movie is more about Everett Hitch than it is about Virgil Cole. With Viggo playing Hitch in the flick I hope that is a carry over from the book. Early reports from the limited release are this is a winner. I can't wait. This is going to be very good.

 

If you were a fan of TOMBSTONE which was based on a Parker's book GUNMAN'S RHAPSODY then you will love this.

 

Thanks for the clips, I'm going to check them out now.

 

I found a couple of interviews over on VEOH, 1st one is a great interview with Ed Harris, second one is a great interview with Viggo, but you can tell the lady giving the interview is not a big western fan...

 

http://www.veoh.com/videos/v15869023gPWSwM...6574&rank=2

 

 

http://www.veoh.com/videos/v158769569w9AeP...viewType=search

Link to post
Share on other sites

I adore Ed Harris! My favorite film he's done is The Abyss. Please correct me if I'm wrong but I don't think he's done a western before. That seems a bit odd to me, because I think he's a perfect fit for this genre. I'm just surprised he hasn't done one before.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I adore Ed Harris! My favorite film he's done is The Abyss. Please correct me if I'm wrong but I don't think he's done a western before. That seems a bit odd to me, because I think he's a perfect fit for this genre. I'm just surprised he hasn't done one before.

 

Here is Ed Haris' IMDb page: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000438/

 

There's a little bit of western type stuff there, but not much. I agree with you, though. I think he fits right in there.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I adore Ed Harris! My favorite film he's done is The Abyss. Please correct me if I'm wrong but I don't think he's done a western before. That seems a bit odd to me, because I think he's a perfect fit for this genre. I'm just surprised he hasn't done one before.

 

I'll have to look it up for sure but I think it was like 97 or 98 when he did a cable tv movie RIDERS of the PURPLE SAGE, based on a Zane Grey novel. It also co-starred Amy Madigan, who I have absolutely loved since I saw her in STREETS of FIRE, waaaaaay back in the 80's.

 

Purple Sage is a very good tv western movie, up there with the Sacketts and Crossfire Creek.

 

Thanks for posting those interviews Andy, I enjoyed them!!

 

Gotta wait a few more weeks to see it though.

 

:(

 

yeah....IT'S KILLIN' ME MAN!!!!!!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am really looking forward to this film. Love pretty much damn near everything that Ed Harris has done, and now a Western... Awesome.

Smart to get Viggo too. I guess if you are Ed Harris, finding great actors to be in your movie is not so difficult, which is a real testament to his abilities and reputation.

 

I'm a big fan of the film he did with is wife, Amy Madigan called "Alamo Bay". It's a small story, but a very gripping drama and Ed is sooo good in it. But then he's good in everything he does.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Alamo Bay is a really good movie, really good. Highly recommended if you haven't seen it you are missing out on some great performances.

 

It is also going to be nice seeing Lance Henrickson doing something besides Ed Harley in a PUMPKIN head sequel. The caracter he plays in Appaloosa, Ring Shelton, a bad assgun hand, I had pictured as a younger actor, I think he will pull it of just fine. Ring Shelton is nothing like the dandy he played in The Quick and the Dead, Ace Hanlon.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Assgun? ;)

 

Empire Falls is FANTASTIC!!!!!! I can't say enough about that film/miniseries.

Paul Newman too is a wonder.

 

Alamo Bay is sublime. No one does rage like Ed Harris.

 

Appaloosa has done well in its opening weekend – but it only opened on 18 screens.

Let's hope that it goes wider this week. I'm sure it will, I've seen TV spots for Christ sakes.

Support the Western! This one should not disappoint!!!!

 

And as for Lance, I can't wait to see Henrickson do his fucking thing. He's gold.

Viva Jesse Hooker!

 

- TB

Link to post
Share on other sites
Assgun? ;)

 

- TB

 

:P:lol: LOL :blink: assgun...doh!...let's try badass gunhand, there, that works so much better than ASSGUN...I worked with a kid up in the northern part of Michgan, back in the 70's, Tim White, if he drank enough STROHS beer it sounded like he had an ASSGUN!!!... :P hehehhe, i got to work that into a story somewhere...

Link to post
Share on other sites

PqljKXr.jpg

 

Ed Harris took Old West self-sufficiency to heart with his latest film.

 

First, Harris secured the rights to Robert B. Parker's Western novel "Appaloosa" and pitched it to buddy Viggo Mortensen, who agreed to co-star with him in the saga of two upright pals aiming to clean up a lawless town.

 

Then Harris co-wrote the screenplay, produced and directed the film and put in 10-hour days to help edit it.

 

Harris even followed the singing-cowboy trail, co-writing and crooning a rootsy song for the end credits.

 

Appropriately, Harris was on a horseback-riding trip with his family in Ireland in 2005 when he read Parker's book. Harris said he had read some of Parker's "Spenser" mysteries and picked up "Appaloosa" because it "had a cool cover and looked like a neat book.

 

"Then I just started reading this thing and was totally delighted with the relationship between these two guys," Harris said in an interview at the Toronto International Film Festival, where "Appaloosa" premiered.

 

"I read the first couple scenes, literally, probably read 35 pages of the book or less and called my agent and said, `Find out if this is available,' because it just tickled me."

 

The movie rights were open, and soon after, Harris passed the book on to Mortensen while they were promoting their film "A History of Violence" at the Toronto festival that same year. After Mortensen signed on, Harris got to work on the screenplay with his friend Robert Knott.

 

Harris stars as the close-lipped Virgil Cole, who arrives in Appaloosa as the new marshal along with longtime trail partner Everett Hitch (Mortensen). Bold, supremely capable and unshakably loyal, the two implement an iron-fisted rule over the town, taking on a gang led by a murderous rancher (Jeremy Irons).

 

Complicating matters is Virgil's romance with a widow (Renee Zellweger), a woman prone to indiscretion and indelicate behavior.

 

"Appaloosa," which has played two weekends in narrow release and expands to more theaters Friday, marks Harris' return to directing after his acclaimed filmmaking debut "Pollock," which earned him the third of his four acting Academy Award nominations and won the supporting actress Oscar for Marcia Gay Harden.

 

While "Pollock" was a labor of love shot on a tiny budget, "Appaloosa" was a much bigger production loaded with action and period design, a test of Harris' filmmaking chops.

 

"It makes you trust yourself. It makes you be much more decisive than I am normally in life, because you can't afford to hem and haw," Harris said. "You've got to make decisions, and also, it's great in terms of your relationships with people and delegating responsibility. ...

 

"The doing of it, it's kind of thrilling. It's a moment-to-moment proposition. I don't really live like that on a normal day. I'm not that consumed. It's fun. I like it. I couldn't do it 365 days of the year, but basically, you dive in, you know some day you're going to be done with it, and you just go for it."

 

Harris began his career in theater and television before earning early big-screen acclaim as astronaut John Glenn in "The Right Stuff." He has taken on occasional lead roles but mostly has built a film career in standout supporting gigs in such movies as "Apollo 13," "The Truman Show," "The Hours" and "Gone Baby Gone."

 

It was tough lining up the money for "Appaloosa," because Westerns generally have been out of favor in Hollywood in recent decades. Westerns do not sell well overseas, where financial backers hope to recoup much of their investment, Harris said.

 

He ultimately managed to raise a modest budget of about $20 million for the production, which was largely shot in New Mexico.

 

Harris had to fight to keep in sequences aboard an old steam train that are pivotal to the action, along with a shootout that was filmed in Texas.

 

"I said, `If you start taking away these elements, the production value of this thing is not going to be what it's supposed to be. It's not going to have the visual impact it needs. It's part of the story,'" Harris said. "Anyway, we finally got it set up and going. It wasn't a luxurious shoot by any means, but we did have the means to do it."

 

Harris approaches filmmaking with workmanlike facility, his co-stars said.

 

"He's generally pretty efficient," Mortensen said. "He had to be because of the budget and wanting to put so much of it on the screen in terms of the production values."

 

"He's not a man of many words, you know. He shows up and says what he's hoping for, sets it up and puts it to film," Zellweger said. "Everything was just so comfortable and easy. Maybe that says more than any anecdote I might come up with. He's confident and he's pretty clear about he wants, and it just kind of falls into place."

 

Harris did some musicals in his college acting days and has played guitar and piano, the latter for his 2006 turn as the composer in "Copying Beethoven."

 

But the song he sings over the closing credits, "You'll Never Leave My Heart," came about as a bit of a fluke, Harris writing the lyrics and Jeff Beal, who did the movie's musical score, coming up with the tune.

 

"I was up late one night just fooling around, you know. I showed it to him, he goes, `Let me try to write some music for it,'" Harris said. "Anyway, it was fun. We had a good time recording it."

 

Harris' song is an earthy, angry romantic reproach sounding like something a lonely cowboy could have concocted around a campfire back in Old West times.

 

Preceding it over the end credits is a modern country-rock tune from Tom Petty and his band Mudcrutch, "Scare Easy." Harris initially resisted the Petty song, finding the tone too contemporary for his 19th century tale.

 

"The first time I listened to it, I went, `No, this is not right,'" Harris said. "But then I kept listening to it and we tried it over the credits, and it was like, `Yeah, man, the film's over. ... Let's rock.'"

 

News Link

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I had my butt in a seat at 7pm last night watching this...jesus, I can't say enough good things about it. The performances are awesome, cept for maybe Irons, his seemed to be a bit mailed in, it was solid, but not as good as the rest of the cast.

 

Viggo and Harris have a great chemistry on the screen, hopefully this movie does well and we get to see the sequel, RESOLUTION, brought to the big screen. Visually this movie is a thing of beauty, the story telling? It's even better than the visuals. Ed Harris captured the heart and soul of the book and story, then presented it for all us western lovers to drool over...

 

Now as a side note...DAMN YOU ALL! ;) ...I used to be able to go to a movie and watch it as a geeky fan boy, not worried about little things, just seeing the flick for what it is, just totally lost in my ignorance. Now I find myself sitting there trying to find "GIFT SHOP" signs hanging in the back ground. Or guns being used that where not from that time period...thankfully it has not ruined the viewing experience for me...yet...but when it does...it'll be all your fault, all of you :P ...there is a lot of truth to the sayings, "ignorance is bliss" and "there's no going back now"...shit...I should have taken the blue pill...

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Just got home from watching this tonight. The man and I both enjoyed this. I haven't read the book, but I enjoyed the dialogue - some understated humor. Other times, Ed and Viggo just had to look at each other - no words exchanged - and went on to do their thing. Really enjoyed how their characters interacted. Renee didn't do that much for me, but I guess she was okay. I didn't have a problem with Jeremy, but his character really wasn't developed all that much.

 

The scenery and interiors seemed right. It always felt right. I guess I didn't have a problem getting lost in my ignorance.

 

Anyway, I don't get to see many movies on the big screen, so I'm glad this was one of them.

 

k-skye

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I'm jealous.

I wanted to get out tonight to see this but it didn't happen.

I still have time to hit my perfect slot, the late show, but there is too much work to be done that didn't get attention this weekend.

Glad to hear the sparkling reviews.

Thanks for not spoiling.

I gotta see Apaloosa this week.

 

- TB

Link to post
Share on other sites
Well I'm jealous.

I wanted to get out tonight to see this but it didn't happen.

I still have time to hit my perfect slot, the late show, but there is too much work to be done that didn't get attention this weekend.

Glad to hear the sparkling reviews.

Thanks for not spoiling.

I gotta see Apaloosa this week.

 

- TB

 

Honestly, I think you'll love it. It is almost a must see on the big screen because of the panaramic views. The country side is worth it by it's self.

 

And the story is very much worth it! GO!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Well I'm jealous.

I wanted to get out tonight to see this but it didn't happen.

I still have time to hit my perfect slot, the late show, but there is too much work to be done that didn't get attention this weekend.

Glad to hear the sparkling reviews.

Thanks for not spoiling.

I gotta see Apaloosa this week.

 

- TB

 

Well, if there is anything I can do to help, let me know. :P

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest AdminGuyX

Yeah, Tim, this is a pretty damn good film. Make the time to see this in the theater. It's beautifully shot.

 

I have to admit I was pretty riveted through most of it, despite being in a theater with talky folks (asked them to be quiet twice, and then just moved), and an old lady hooked to a breathing machine that kept letting out "PFT" sounds every 15 seconds.

 

It's shot in the same location as the final showdown from 3:10 to Yuma, no mistaking it, but they did a good job of redressing the town, and adding lots of very nice touches, signage and such. They added a lot of interior walls to the practical location sets we've seen before in 3:10 (and I think Silverado years ago) and it worked beautifully.

 

There is a second town in it too that I thought looked pretty damn cool. Great Spanish style church, and architecture. I'd love to know where that is, and if it's real or if they built the whole thing. Probably have to waits for the DVD to know for sure.

 

This is a rather understated, and quiet film. Nothing is played for high drama, and there is no pulse pounding action. It's not a perfect movie, it's got some flaws. The characters are flawed, but noble, and not generally ill intentioned. And full of surprises too. They make choices you don't expect.

 

When the story flips, and the narrative takes on a more focused feeling you almost don't want it to. You almost want to spend more time with these guys sitting around and chatting with each other before the guns start to fire.

 

I can see the story working better in novel form though. There is clearly supposed to be a passage of time at one point in the film, but it's dealt with in a such a quiet and understated way, it feels a bit off.

 

All the gun play was well done. The sound design for the gun shots was probably some of the most perfect I've ever heard. The gunshots sounded more "right" then any film I've maybe ever seen.

 

And the gun work in the film is very well done, and there are nice touches here you don't usually see, like the characters reloading right after shooting someone, before they holster their weapons. Which is accurate. Nobody ever holstered a pistol half empty if they had bullets.

Link to post
Share on other sites
And the gun work in the film is very well done, and there are nice touches here you don't usually see, like the characters reloading right after shooting someone, before they holster their weapons. Which is accurate. Nobody ever holstered a pistol half empty if they had bullets.

 

This is pure PARKER, showing his L'mour influence. In the book he makes a few statements about how PROFESSIONAL gunmen always reload before they holster. L'mour always had his heros reload and in almost every story written, the bad guys lack of reloading comes back to haunt somebody.

 

I loved how the movie just quietly showed them doing it. The other thing I loved was how they did the shootouts. You'll see what I mean when you watch it. But I truely believe this is how they happened.

 

Can't stress enough how much I loved this movie.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to confess that after seeing Appaloosa last night I was not overly impressed with it.

In fact, I was somewhat disappointed. Hard to put a finger on the why.

The performances were damn good, the cinematography was real nice.

But the pacing of the film felt disjointed and fractured.

I'm all for a slower film and that wasn't the problem.

Possibly it's that Harris stuck TOO close to the novel (which I have not read) for the film's own good.

The first act played splendidly with me. The second act seemed bogged down, and the third act and resolution was anticlimactic for me.

Hell, I almost started to like

Bragg toward the end. As the film progressed he seemed innocuous and even benign. The ruthlessness of the act committed at the beginning lost all of it's steam as the character evolved through the film.

 

Would have loved to see more of Lance Henrikson but it was nice to see him in the mix.

I have to say I'm a big fan of the work of composer Jeff Beal (Carnival, Rome), but I fairly despised this score.

There was absolutely no depth to it at all (in my opinion). A lot of it seemed out of place and it gave me no feeling of creating a compelling or complimentary texture to the narrative. It seemed incidental. The traditional instruments employed had no feeling, it was as if an automaton or computer were giving the performances. This was especially disappointing to me. I kept hearing Johnny Greenwood's score to There Will Be Blood in my head, thinking that would have fit the film way better in parts. I guess my main bitch is that in spite of the traditional instrumentation it felt out of place and kept distracting me. I hate when I'm watching a film and my attention is redirected by something that should be enhancing my focus.

 

Appaloosa wasn't bad, it just wasn't all that good. Or maybe it's because it wasn't GREAT that I'm disappointed.

I think my expectations were elevated considering the talent involved.

 

All the nice touches you guys spoke of were there to be sure, the sound of the gun reports, the technical accuracy, etc . . .

Loved the dynamic between the two lead characters, the reoccurring character bits, like Virgil's "How do you say . . . . "add 50 cent word here".

I loved that he was a guy who was trying to become more learned in his latter years. Mortensen was fantastic as always.

Loved when Luce Rains (Local Albuquerque actor) got jacked in the teeth by the butt of Virgil's pistol. Ouch!

I loved the little bit's of humor where the two principles were concerned. Thought all that worked quite well.

Mortensen's horse was a beauty.

 

I think with some judicious editing my issues with the film would be put to rest.

I wanted to love this film and didn't.

Maybe this one will grow on me.

I hope so.

 

Hopefully, my thoughts here will not sway anyone from seeing this film.

This is by no means a thumbs down, it's just not an enthusiastic thumbs up.

 

- TB

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, go see it and make up your own mind (as I know you will).

Even if I knew in advance how I'd feel after seeing it I still would have went.

For many of us, seeing a western like this is mandatory.

There are films you have to see on a big theater screen, this is one of them.

 

- TB

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...