Jump to content

80th Annual Academy Award Winners


Tim Bradstreet
 Share

Recommended Posts

Like I said before, I'm no huge Clooney fan. I did enjoy him on ER but when he made the jump into films I too had an assfull of his little ticks. "The cocky head tilt and swagger" is a great way to describe the very thing that bothered me because it seemed to permeate every performance he gave. Most notably for me, in Peacemaker, and his small turn in The Thin Red Line, but also everything previous. Then he did Three Kings which I thought he was cast well in. I thought he was real good. Then Fail Safe, also well cast. Then he did this little Coen Brother's movie, O Brother, Where Art Thou? And he did something I'd never seen him do . . . He became someone else.

Maybe it took the Coen Bros to raise his game, but from there on in I definitely noticed that the "The cocky head tilt and swagger" were all but gone and stripped away from his performances (at least in the films I've seen). Before the Coen's I'd had all I could take of "The cocky head tilt and swagger". I literally wanted to scream when he showed up at the end of The Thin Red Line and gave us the patented cocky-head-tilt-swagger. It was like I'd just seen this unforgettable film unfold in front of me and in walks George Clooney being Clooney! It was ghastly. So believe me when I say it took me a while to move beyond that. I honestly don't mind so much when an actor makes a living from playing himself (it was the cocky-head-tilt-swagger that made me want to slit my own wrists!). Some of my favorite actors made a LIVING out of playing themselves -

John Wayne, Cary Grant, Clark Gable, Clint Eastwood, hell, Bruce Willis, etc . . . Now I don't necessarily put Clooney on a pedestal with those guys, but, I don't begrudge him that he isn't Philip Seymour Hoffman either. Given the right roles in the right films (as long as the cocky-head-tilt-swagger is not in attendance) I enjoy what Clooney DOES bring more often now than not. I've enjoyed practically everything he's done since the Coen Bros jumpstart, with the exception of some Oceans sequels. Bob Weinstein was recently quoted as saying this (and he said this to Jane) - Hanks is Jimmy Stewart, Clooney is Cary Grant, and you (Jane) are Gary Cooper.

That's quite a compliment to all three, but it also has a ring of truth to it. And Weinstein isn't the only one to make the Cary Grant/Clooney comparison.

Now take that with a grain of salt. There is only one Jimmy Stewart, one Cary Grant, and one Gary Cooper, but in the Hollywood of today this statement does have some resonance.

 

Anyway, I'm not out to change anyone's mind on the subject, I'm just talkin'.

 

- TB

 

 

Lol, Tim. I was beginning to think I was the only one who noticed that "cocky-head-tilt-swagger" that Clooney did. I liked The Peacemaker, but his performance just ruined it for me (that and the fact that it was riddled with one cliche after another). But I did LOVE his performance in O Brother, Where Art Thou?. It's like you said, in that movie, he stepped up his game, and has begun to get better with each performance. I liked the Oceans movies (at least the first two were okay) but there was still a little bit of that swaggering in them, though not as obvious as in his earlier performances. He actually didn't really start that until he switched to movies. Because I remember watching him in ER, Facts of Life, and Roseanne, and it wasn't that noticeable then.

But on to your last remarks about actors who were basically portraying themselves. I have heard SO many people criticise John Wayne, and say that his performances were all alike, that you couldn't tell one from another. Yet they hail Gary Cooper as one of the greatest who ever lived. And I'm not saying he wasn't, but one of the most interesting things I ever read about Cooper was something that Ingrid Bergman (who is another one of my favorite all-time actresses) wrote in her autobiography. She said that the first time she met Cooper was when they were making the movie For Whom the Bell Tolls ( a classic book and movie), and he started reading his lines, but he sounded like himself, not as if he were acting. He wasn't "in character", so to speak. He just started reciting his lines as if he were having a conversation with her instead of rehearsing. Back then, so many actors were so much larger than life that their persona just eclipsed whatever role they were playing. And when that happens to an actor, it makes it harder for the audience to distinguish them from their characters. That is what I believe has happened to a lot of actors today, like Clooney, McConaughey, and so many others. It's so much easier for audiences to appreciate the talents of lesser known actors because they don't have to try to separate their characters from their real persona. But it's still the big-name actors who get all the kudos and credit in Hollywood. And that's not fair.

I love what Weinstein said to Thomas. That is classic, and such a compliment. Thomas should have that printed, framed and hang it on his wall, lol.

 

Just kidding. I know Thomas doesn't care about compliments and ego-building stuff like that. Which is what makes him so cool.

 

Oh, and the above post, lol!! I love your comments. SO true! Who gives a crap how many million people watch an awards show, anyway? It's a once a year thing, and the only reason most people watch them is to see how they're dressed anyway. The speeches are almost always dull, the entertainment flat, and the host (if there is one) is usually a dud (like Stewart). The best hosts the Oscars have ever had were Whoopi and Billy Crystal.

 

And if the film analysts and critics are now picking apart the very show that recognizes the movies that they've already picked apart, they must be REALLY bored! I almost always disagree with the critics anyway. So if they pan a movie, I generally find that I like it. I will listen to a friend or someone else who has seen it before I will listen to a critic. The only exception being The Mist. Loved the reviews for that. But to me, it doesn't matter if a movie is #1 at the box office, or if it's made 100 million dollars. That's not why I go and see them. If a trailer doesn't appeal to me, I won't go. And I have often boycotted movies simply because they were overmarketed and overpromoted and it felt like they were being shoved down my throat. I'm kinda funny like that. I like to choose what I want to watch based on what I like, not what someone tells me I should like.

 

mediumfan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just kidding. I know Thomas doesn't care about compliments and ego-building stuff like that. Which is what makes him so cool.

 

mediumfan

Yeah. I can't picture Tom going around to stadiums or restaurants going, "You better let me in. What?! You don't know who I am?! I'm Tom F*ckin' Jane!"

 

Be funny for him if he did it as a comedy skit though haha

 

JO

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Had to comment on this - In RED

That cracked me up. Still, those dudes are Stuh-Range. Thank God Frances McDormand is around so those guys can lighten up once in a while ;)

She seemed 1000 times more excited then they for their wins, though I didn't take their introverted posture as anything but what it was.

 

- TB

 

You could also hear Josh Brolin laughing at them in the background, so you know it was definately a personality thing. I also liked Josh's apology to Nicholson about his horrible impression.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
Favorite underrated actors -

 

1. Jeff Bridges

2. David Thewliss

3. Graham Greene

4. Christopher Plummer

5. Colm Feore

5. Paul Bettany

6. Christopher Eccleston

7. Charles Dance

8. F. Murray Abraham

9. Bob Peck

10. James Purefoy

11. Tchéky Karyo

12. Tobey Jones

13. Michael Wincott

14. Mark Addy

15. Danny Huston

 

- TB

 

You do realize the vast majority of these folks are foreign born and trained. Do you think the training is better across the pond, or is there just something in the culture over there?

 

Also, just wondering, have you ever seen Graham Greene on the Red Green Show?

 

-Vicki

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Edited with American birthplace in red, Foreign in green.

 

Favorite underrated actors -

 

1. Jeff Bridges - B - Los Angeles, California, USA

2. David Thewliss - B -Blackpool, Lancashire, England, UK

3. Graham Greene - B -Six Nations Reserve, Ontario, Canada

4. Christopher Plummer - B - Toronto, Ontario, Canada

5. Colm Feore - B - Boston, Massachusetts, USA

5. Paul Bettany - B - Harlesden, London, England, UK

6. Christopher Eccleston - B - Salford, Lancashire, England, UK

7. Charles Dance - B - Redditch, Worcestershire, England, UK

8. F. Murray Abraham - B - Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

9. Bob Peck - B - Leeds, Yorkshire, England, UK

10. James Purefoy - B - Taunton, Somerset, England, UK

11. Tchéky Karyo - B - Istanbul, Turkey

12. Tobey Jones - B - Oxford, England, UK

13. Michael Wincott - B - Toronto, Ontario, Canada

14. Mark Addy - B - York, England, UK

15. Danny Huston - B - Rome, Italy Though daddy was American born.

 

- TB

 

And there you have it, the vast majority ARE foreign born.

As for trained? Who's to say, it would take more research.

Still, this was just off the top of my head. I was never thinking about Nationality.

Funny though. I think I just like who I like. What constitutes good acting with me may be different for someone else.

Still, I think there is some truth to foreign actors having a certain flair for the dramatic, or perhaps it just removes them an extra step from familiarity.

I've always been a huge fan of British actors, especially the one's trained at the Royal Shakespeare Company. Theater training is one of those things you can't substitute.

 

"Also, just wondering, have you ever seen Graham Greene on the Red Green Show? "

Never heard of it. Where can I see some of that?

 

- T

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Still, I think there is some truth to foreign actors having a certain flair for the dramatic, or perhaps it just removes them an extra step from familiarity.

I've always been a huge fan of British actors, especially the one's trained at the Royal Shakespeare Company. Theater training is one of those things you can't substitute.

 

"Also, just wondering, have you ever seen Graham Greene on the Red Green Show? "

Never heard of it. Where can I see some of that?

 

- T

 

Could be. I just wondered if you noticed when you made your list. I gave IMDb a workout looking up several of them, and all were familiar. Just not their names.

 

As for The Red Green Show. You can take a look at

http://www.redgreen.com

They sell the DVDs from the show there, but you can find them cheaper on Amazon. Trouble is, Graham Greene is only in a few episodes, and only for a short bit. Hilarious, though. You can check out the video clips on the website to get a feel for the Canadian humor.

It's different.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...