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300 style look for Spaghetti Western

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Digital technology can be used for both good and evil. Where it's strength lies is in the ability to empower someone to be a one man band in content creation. As I've argued elsewhere the issue actually becomes that of distribution.

 

I spent the last three days playing around with some old green screen footage I shot three years ago. Originally it was shot for the mobile phone version of A Bullet Waits For You.

 

I found an old stock image cd I purchased for $5. It has an Old West folder so I keyed the jpeg's in as background.

 

Muzzle flashes and bullet hits are all composites. Muzzle flashes from Artbeats stock image libraries. Bullet hits using particle effects - not happywith the shading but shows room for improvement.

 

Key is layering the sound - effects and foley to add depth to the visual.

 

Depth of field is also the trick - so soften the focus on the background elements.

 

Interested to hear thoughts.

 

Digital Composite

 

Ideally I would love to shoot out on location but if resources became tight you could still construct a strong visual narrative using this technique.

 

Keen to hear thoughts and feedback.

 

regards

 

Andrew

 

 

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Is this terribly different from old westerns that had scenes filmed on soundstages with painted backgrounds? If anything, it would look more realistic than that did. But when the viewer is engaged in a worthwhile story, the scenery is not too important as long as it doesn't distract. Unless, or course, the scenery is integral to the story.

 

Those are just some random thoughts.

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Unless, or course, the scnenery is integral to the story.

 

Therein lies the issue with the western genre in that the scenery is part of the character of the story. However you are right in that a lot of the earlier westerns were shot in studio. Even evidence of this in films like Maverick.

 

I agree that as long as the narrative engages you shouldn't be distracted by the individual shots.

 

Appreciate the input.

 

regards

 

Andrew

 

 

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For the most part, it looked pretty good. The first scene is the only one I saw were you could really tell it was a composite. Like you mentioned before, it was a combination of the depth of field along with the sight line and color. The second and third sene I though fit together really well. Considering this was made from a $5 stock footage CD, and using footage that (I'm assuming here) was not intended to be used with this disk, I'd say you did a bang up job. Can't wait to see what you have in store with A Bullet Waits For You.

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For the most part, it looked pretty good. The first scene is the only one I saw were you could really tell it was a composite. Like you mentioned before, it was a combination of the depth of field along with the sight line and color. The second and third sene I though fit together really well. Considering this was made from a $5 stock footage CD, and using footage that (I'm assuming here) was not intended to be used with this disk, I'd say you did a bang up job. Can't wait to see what you have in store with A Bullet Waits For You.

 

Cheers for that. Yes they were very quick comps. Purely as an exploration to what digital technology can empower. Personally I can't stomach the notion of shooting a western in this vein unless budgetary constraints really formulated the notion of it. The thing is for me is that all its takes is one shot that doesn't work to destroy the persona the film is trying to create. So if I had to do a production using this technique I would make all the elements live plates - ie shoot the muzzle flashes, squibs, and smoke as real against green screen - then all you are doing is compositing. Fake blood is so easy to miss the mark and look fake.

 

regards

 

Andrew

 

 

 

 

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If only more directors would think this way. The key for CG to work, like you mentioned, is that it only takes one mistake to pull you out of the film. I'm glad Peter Jackson used every trick in the book when working on LOTR. My first thoughts were of CG disaster.

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