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Tim Bradstreet

Robert E. Howard's - Desert Adventures

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I can vouch for the paper as well. You WILL NOT be disappointed in anything you order from Tim.

 

Blade Runner, Tim Bradstreet, and Masamune Shirow decorates the office walls. And a cool smith and wesson tin sign. ;) And a replica of sting from LOTR.

 

So, I was thinking of venturing to Borders this week, would I find the book there maybe? Or should I hit amazon? or Tim, can I just order it from you?

 

I really dig that warm up art Tim. I bet you have loads of kick ass work just laying around that was "warm up" art, doncha'?

 

 

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Noeland, I checked Barnes & Nobles' website and they have it listed as being available on Feb. 9th, so that's the first place I'm going to look for my copy.

 

 

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It should be in all major book chains.

I always make the mistake of not calling first, which sometimes leaves me empty-handed with a wasted trip.

Does it make us dinosaurs if we like to actually get in our cars, drive to a store and actually purchase a physical copy? ;)

 

I have a B&N down the hill from me so I'll try there. I don't have comp copies yet.

Hoping I get a box of them from Paradox or Del Rey, then I can offer signed copies here to whomever wishes one.

 

Thanks for the kind words Noe!!

 

xo - tb

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Only gonna preview one more new one after this, don't want to give EVERYTHING away, gotta leave some surprises for the book! ;)

 

So far I've neglected Steve Clarney.

Clarney is another American adventurer that Howard created among his Desert Adventurers.

The character is quite different than Gordon or O'Donnell, though also very iconic and cool.

You'll recognize my buddy Con Schell as the face of Steve Clarney - Finally! With no kafiyeh or turban obscuring his features ;)

 

This is the header illustration from the sole Clarney adventure Howard undertook -

The Fires Of Asshurbanipal

 

Header11FireOfAsshurbanipalF1.jpg

 

 

- TB

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It's already out?

Wow, I didn't think it was available until Tuesday. Cool.

 

Yeah, the Keegan's are fantastic, they were also my art directors, they really kept me on point.

 

I'd love to do a portfolio of some of the images, maybe do a few new ones as well.

Have to see what Paradox says about that.

Portfolios notoriously move so-so from a sales perspective, but doing a signed, limited run of say 500 might just do.

Will take some looking into.

 

In the meantime Rifleman, if you are interested I do museum quality Giclees.

The paper is out of this world awesome.

There are a few folks around here who can vouch.

 

I'd make you or anyone else a good deal.

Normally they are $30.00 a piece but I could definitely do a good deal for an order that included 5 or more images.

5 for a Hondo, which would be a third off the normal price if purchased individually.

 

Giclees are 13" wide by 19" tall.

 

- TB

 

PS - Incidentally, my web sales guy went out of business so I'll be handling all print sales, Maximum Black, and my new book Archetype, all by my lonesome for the time being.

I'll be starting a new store thread soon where you can order within the thread or by personal message. I don't do credit cards but I do take Paypal, personal checks, money orders, etc . . .

More soon.

VERY interested in the giclee. What's the procedure? Order through your web site?

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VERY interested in the giclee. What's the procedure? Order through your web site?

 

Nothing set up through the site currently.

Best way to do it is send me a private message here (click on my avatar, it'll take you to my page, you can message me from there).

Or if you are more comfortable with regular email then send me that message and I'll send you my private email address.

Any questions don't hesitate to ask. :)

 

- TB

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OK, this'll be the last preview, the book comes out tomorrow.

It's available at all major book chains or order through Amazon, where you can get the book at discount.

 

This is one of my favorites, a vignette illustration from the great El Borak story, Three-Bladed Doom.

 

Vig11.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

I'll post some more artwork from the book after this week.

If any of you end up grabbing and checking out the book would love to hear comments, and those comments need not solely be about artwork.

I'm a huge Howard and El Borak/O'Donnell/Clarney fan so would love to hear what you have to say about the stories as well!!

 

- TB

 

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WMD87.jpg

 

Hey! If you guys are interested in what Tim has to say about his work on El Borak, then check him out at the above event.

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Tim:

 

I'll be in touch about giclee prints from El Borak. It'll be after the end of the month; have to wait till the eagle screams.

 

Some thoughts on the book:

 

1. The artwork more closely matches the text than in any previous Del Rey with the exception of Gianni's work in SK and the Bloody Crown of Conan. This matters. Being forced to burn a good image because Kirby O'Donnell is shown with a pistol when he has none in the story may be frustrating to the artist, but it keeps faith with the integrity of REH and with the the reader.

 

2. You know the period and it shows. The images feel authentic and real.

 

3. The Daughter of Erlik Khan may have the most breakneck pacing of any Howard story. Serious drive.

 

4. One thing that is consistently overlooked by superficial readers of Howard's characters is that they really suffer. Yes, their savage vitality sees them through where other men would fall, but they are not superhuman. El Borak in particular takes a hell of a beating in these stories, reeling with exhaustion, getting his head near stove in. This lends his characters — admittedly superior specimens that they are a greater "realism." And there are historical antecedents among similar types of men: Hugh Glass surviving a mauling by a grizzly and crawling for a hundred miles to seek revenge. The frontiersman Simon Kenton surviving a tomahawk blow to the head and being tied naked and backwards on a horse and turned loose to bash through the Ohio Valley forest... the list goes on.

 

I think the secret of REH's ongoing appeal (besides sheer storytelling prowess) is that even if one cannot match Conan's physique or El Borak's preternatural swiftness, we can all aspire to that never-say-die grit that is much more fundamental to the characters than their pure physical prowess.

 

5. I find it interesting — and a bit amusing — the lengths Howard goes to to relieve Gordon of his firearms so that he is forced to go blade-to-blade with his foes. Part of me wants to see him pull an Indiana Jones and bring a gun to a sword fight.

 

I am not one to consider REH the greatest writer who ever lived. He's not, by a long shot. Others are his match as storytellers. But Howard is the man who inspired me to write and thus set my feet on the path that I have followed for the past 20 years. Lovecraft knew his secret: that Howard is in every one of his stories. There is no substitute for passion and Howard's leaps off the page. Art that matches that and lives up to it is remarkable, so you oughta be proud of yourself.

 

P.S. The folks at the conan.com forum seem to really like the work as well.

 

Long post, but you asked for it...

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Comments in Maroon -

 

Tim:

 

I'll be in touch about giclee prints from El Borak. It'll be after the end of the month; have to wait till the eagle screams.

 

"till the eagle screams" . . . That's fucking awesome ;)

 

Some thoughts on the book:

 

1. The artwork more closely matches the text than in any previous Del Rey with the exception of Gianni's work in SK and the Bloody Crown of Conan. This matters. Being forced to burn a good image because Kirby O'Donnell is shown with a pistol when he has none in the story may be frustrating to the artist, but it keeps faith with the integrity of REH and with the the reader.

 

Yep, so true, that's why I didn't get all pissy when I realized that illustration I spent 40+ hours creating wasn't going to get used. I saw the truth, recognized the reason for NOT using it.

The illustration itself is never wasted. It exists, it has a life of it's own outside but connected to the story. That's good enough for me. I set out to do honor to the illustrators who came before me and at the same time carve out my own territory. Jim and Ruth Keegan can be credited with keeping me on track, and bless them for doing so. At the beginning I had this crazy idea, the idea was to evoke the stories with illustrations that were much more ambiguous to the central action. It would be El Borak we'd see in the composition but I wouldn't be taking the text SO completely literal. I don't like to see an artists representation of EXACTLY what is being described by the writer because it seems that 9 times out of 10 the artwork is presented in the book before I've had the opportunity to actually read that part, consequently it can ruin a climactic bit of narrative for the reader. I wanted to eliminate that possibility by not being so exact so I set off to illustrate this thing completely with mood. Obviously that's not the real answer to the problem, but I had to learn this the hard way. Experience counts. Jim and Ruth got me back on the road while still feeling like I didn't have to show every detail. I began to gain a better understanding of the process with each illustration and eventually felt like I had a good handle on things. I'd still be treading water if it hadn't been for the lifeline the Keegan's tossed me ;)

 

2. You know the period and it shows. The images feel authentic and real.

 

That's the one thing I had a feel for from the beginning. Thank you!

 

3. The Daughter of Erlik Khan may have the most breakneck pacing of any Howard story. Serious drive.

 

Great story, classic Howard.

 

4. One thing that is consistently overlooked by superficial readers of Howard's characters is that they really suffer. Yes, their savage vitality sees them through where other men would fall, but they are not superhuman. El Borak in particular takes a hell of a beating in these stories, reeling with exhaustion, getting his head near stove in. This lends his characters — admittedly superior specimens that they are a greater "realism." And there are historical antecedents among similar types of men: Hugh Glass surviving a mauling by a grizzly and crawling for a hundred miles to seek revenge. The frontiersman Simon Kenton surviving a tomahawk blow to the head and being tied naked and backwards on a horse and turned loose to bash through the Ohio Valley forest... the list goes on.

 

Great perspective. I agree totally. The sheer will to go on in perilous circumstances, due to wounds, exhaustion, or whatever befalls the protagonist is the hallmark of our favorite heroes.

Howard doesn't always tap into the Hemingway psyche, it never gets existential cause it's pulp adventure. But he opens the door enough to know that these characters sometimes suffer through HELL and persevere in spite of all the odds. El Borak's tenacity and endurance are to be admired. It's no fun if there are not overwhelming obstacles for the character to overcome. All of that builds the myth. Wanna read a great book where the main character is tested to the limits of human endurance? Check out Pale Horse Coming by Stephen Hunter.

Excellent book.

 

I think the secret of REH's ongoing appeal (besides sheer storytelling prowess) is that even if one cannot match Conan's physique or El Borak's preternatural swiftness, we can all aspire to that never-say-die grit that is much more fundamental to the characters than their pure physical prowess.

 

5. I find it interesting — and a bit amusing — the lengths Howard goes to to relieve Gordon of his firearms so that he is forced to go blade-to-blade with his foes. Part of me wants to see him pull an Indiana Jones and bring a gun to a sword fight.

 

Yeah, he does his fair share of shooting but never in a 'gamble all on a roll of the dice' kind of way. Howard's world is much more immediate than vanquishing an enemy from distance.

With Howard you feel the enemy's breath on your face and it always comes down to base combat. That's what keeps El Borak, Solomon Kane, Bran Mak Morn, Conan, from being mere soldiers. It's man against man in a primitive duel, and there is always the ever-present respect for the feud. There is no honor in sending someone to hell when you bring a gun to a knife fight ;) But you're right . . . I would have loved to see Gordon pull that Colt and go automatic on some prick bastard ;)

 

 

I am not one to consider REH the greatest writer who ever lived. He's not, by a long shot. Others are his match as storytellers. But Howard is the man who inspired me to write and thus set my feet on the path that I have followed for the past 20 years. Lovecraft knew his secret: that Howard is in every one of his stories. There is no substitute for passion and Howard's leaps off the page. Art that matches that and lives up to it is remarkable, so you oughta be proud of yourself.

 

Cheers that. Again, we agree about Howard too. He possessed an innate ability to tap into our passion by projecting his own into his work.

Not the greatest writer who ever lived to be sure, but you have to admire the power and thrift of his talent. We're still reading him voraciously almost 75 years after his death.

That's pretty amazing.

 

P.S. The folks at the conan.com forum seem to really like the work as well.

 

They've been very kind leading up to release. Hard to go read over there now with the book out cause it's a trap for me. I respect the readers too much. Would love any praise but the critical can sometimes cut me deep, and I've no desire to beat myself up more than I have ;)

That doesn't mean you folks should feel compelled to pull a punch in your assessment, it's easier to hear and discuss when I'm on home soil so to speak.

 

Thanks Rifleman, love your insight.

- Tim

 

Long post, but you asked for it...

 

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Picked up a copy of this today at B&N (Finally!!) and thumbing through it, I was, as usual, blown away by the imagery that you've created, TB. Incredible work, as always. Haven't gotten into reading the stories yet, but I'm looking forward to hunkerin' down with this and exploring the world of El Borak in depth. Your images have really whet my appetite for the stories.

 

I think my two favorite sketches are the one in the story, The Daughter of Erlik Khan, that has El Borak in mid-fall (upside-down, no less) with his rifle falling away. Beautiful action shot. Really tells a story all by itself, almost without reading the context of the story.

 

The other one is the low-angle shot of El Borak, looking up at the barrel of his pistol, in The Blood of the Gods. Simple piece, but powerful. Loved it.

 

Hope you're planning to do a compilation of all of your work for this. I'd love to see the ones that didn't make it into the book too.

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Gotta scroll down a bit but there is an update on my webpage that addresses a few of the 'issues' with the printed version of the book.

Also a link to Jim and Ruth Keegan's Two-Gun blog were you can get a look at one of their amazing paintings that somehow got left on the cutting room floor.

And in COLOR!

 

Cool shit - http://timbradstreet.typepad.com/

 

Del Rey has been fantastic about the whole thing and have assured us that the discrepancies will be addressed in subsequent printings.

Great folks at Del Rey, by the way ;)

 

- TB

 

PS - And THANK YOU, MF, for the very kind words!

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Been away for a while. Still plan on ordering up an El Borak giclee as soon as finances allow.

 

Just got a gig as a regular blogger at The Cimmerian (www.thecimmerian.com). I'll be on regularly on Fridays. My first post (March 5) was on pan-Turanian movements c. 1918, based on Son of the White Wolf. My focus will be on REH Westerns and Oriental adventure.

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Awesome, Rifleman -

I think Deuce was just telling me about your arrival a few days ago. Congratulations on docking into a great home harbor.

Sounds like you got some of the best of the bunch, focus-wise ;)

 

I'd been speaking with Fred Malmberg a while back about The Vultures (Paradox are keen to adapt to film). . .

I had to re-familiarize myself with the story so I dug around, found, and re-read my coveted hardcover, Fictioneer Books edition.

That was cool, hadn't read it in a long time, but the reason I'm mentioning this is because inside that same edition there is a story called Showdown In Hell's Canyon . . .

I don't think I'd read that before and I was delighted with the possibilities it has for a film adaptation. I know it can be done with the right guy at the head to fatten the story out properly, give it more of an intro to the characters, etc . . . Even low budget, hell, it SHOULD be low budget, it would make a great little hard-vengeance Western tale.

And I know the perfect young writer/director who could take it all the way ;)

Fred loved it, hopefully we'll pursue it more briskly after Andrew McKenzie finishes Sweetwater.

 

As for giclees - Any time you're ready just consult The Store Page for ordering details.

 

Congratulations once again!

 

- TB

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Hello,

I'm new to this board but have been a Bradstreet fan forever.

And a Robert Howard fan but had never ventured past Conan and Solomon Kane. This book is blowing my mind! Great art, amazing stories. Would kill to see a film of this. Tom Jane as El Borak!

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