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Tim Bradstreet

James Bama

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I actually have this same post in another thread but it applies VERY much here.

 

If you are not familiar with James Bama's body of work here is a taste.

What can I say about Bama that hasn't been said?

For the uninitiated I'll simply say this.

Bama along with Frank Frazetta broke the bounds of the traditional paperback book cover paintings during the 60's, Bama with Doc Savage, along with everything else he touched (which is prolific), and Frazetta with Conan, etc . . .

Bama has influenced generations of artists in the same way as Frazetta. They are both tremendous influences on me personally. Bama more so because when I chose my path, I chose realism (even though I had no idea who Bama was at the time). When I discovered him for myself I felt I found a kindred spirit, and in no way am I comparing myself to the legend. I simply mean that we share a similar vision. The Iconic figure set against a simple background motif. I never consciously tried to emulate what Bama was doing thematically. I think I was more influenced by movie posters or whatever, but the truth is, most of those things that were inspiring me were very likely inspired by Bama to begin with. That's how much his work impacted the world. All of this came home to me recently while leafing through the pages of the book I recommend below. I hadn't noticed before, or perhaps lost sight of the fact of how inspiring the few pieces I'd seen of his over the years must have directed my eye. I don't ask that anyone else understand or agree with the connection. I'm only saying that's how I feel.

Read on dear friends -

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

I HIGHLY recommend "James Bama - American Realist"

 

I've been waiting forever to get my hands on a collection of Bama's paperback book covers, Doc Savage, western's by Louis L'Amour, Zane Grey, etc . . . The classic Aurora Monster model kit boxes . . . Oh my God. I have a wonderful leather-bound, wooden slipcase edition of "The Western Art Of James Bama" which I've had for years and it's one of my treasures. But what I've always really wanted was the adventure stuff. I was born too late to be in on the whole Doc Savage phenomenon. I've only ever seen about a dozen of the 68 covers he did in the series, even have some lithographs, but this book has got it ALL. Man it's a wonder to behold. If you are an artist, believe me, you cannot live without this book.

 

You can get it here -------> http://budplant.com/product.asp?pn=JMH

 

An absolute STEAL in hardcover for $35.00

 

Be the best money you ever spent.

 

 

JamesBamaAmericanRealist.jpg

 

docsavagelg.jpg

 

A-Sioux-Indian-865x914.jpg

 

CheyenneDogSoldier.jpg

 

The work speaks for itself.

 

- TB

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I actually have this same post in another thread but it applies VERY much here.

 

If you are not familiar with James Bama's body of work here is a taste.

What can I say about Bama that hasn't been said?

For the uninitiated I'll simply say this.

Bama along with Frank Frazetta broke the bounds of the traditional paperback book cover paintings during the 60's, Bama with Doc Savage, along with everything else he touched (which is prolific), and Frazetta with Conan, etc . . .

Bama has influenced generations of artists in the same way as Frazetta. They are both tremendous influences on me personally. Bama more so because when I chose my path, I chose realism (even though I had no idea who Bama was at the time). When I discovered him for myself I felt I found a kindred spirit, and in no way am I comparing myself to the legend. I simply mean that we share a similar vision. The Iconic figure set against a simple background motif. I never consciously tried to emulate what Bama was doing thematically. I think I was more influenced by movie posters or whatever, but the truth is, most of those things that were inspiring me were very likely inspired by Bama to begin with. That's how much his work impacted the world. All of this came home to me recently while leafing through the pages of the book I recommend below. I hadn't noticed before, or perhaps lost sight of the fact of how inspiring the few pieces I'd seen of his over the years must have directed my eye. I don't ask that anyone else understand or agree with the connection. I'm only saying that's how I feel.

Read on dear friends -

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I HIGHLY recommend "James Bama - American Realist"

 

I've been waiting forever to get my hands on a collection of Bama's paperback book covers, Doc Savage, western's by Louis L'Amour, Zane Grey, etc . . . The classic Aurora Monster model kit boxes . . . Oh my God. I have a wonderful leather-bound, wooden slipcase edition of "The Western Art Of James Bama" which I've had for years and it's one of my treasures. But what I've always really wanted was the adventure stuff. I was born too late to be in on the whole Doc Savage phenomenon. I've only ever seen about a dozen of the 68 covers he did in the series, even have some lithographs, but this book has got it ALL. Man it's a wonder to behold. If you are an artist, believe me, you cannot live without this book.

 

You can get it here -------> http://budplant.com/product.asp?pn=JMH

 

An absolute STEAL in hardcover for $35.00

 

Be the best money you ever spent.

JamesBamaAmericanRealist.jpg

 

docsavagelg.jpg

 

A-Sioux-Indian-865x914.jpg

 

CheyenneDogSoldier.jpg

 

The work speaks for itself.

 

- TB

Man, I almost forgot about this guy. My dad has the hardcover you're talking about. One of his all time favorite artists.

 

The guy is a God. Good pics too. I'll have to scan some and post 'em on here from my Father's book. Will do.

 

JO

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I actually have this same post in another thread but it applies VERY much here.

 

If you are not familiar with James Bama's body of work here is a taste.

What can I say about Bama that hasn't been said?

For the uninitiated I'll simply say this.

Bama along with Frank Frazetta broke the bounds of the traditional paperback book cover paintings during the 60's, Bama with Doc Savage, along with everything else he touched (which is prolific), and Frazetta with Conan, etc . . .

Bama has influenced generations of artists in the same way as Frazetta. They are both tremendous influences on me personally. Bama more so because when I chose my path, I chose realism (even though I had no idea who Bama was at the time). When I discovered him for myself I felt I found a kindred spirit, and in no way am I comparing myself to the legend. I simply mean that we share a similar vision. The Iconic figure set against a simple background motif. I never consciously tried to emulate what Bama was doing thematically. I think I was more influenced by movie posters or whatever, but the truth is, most of those things that were inspiring me were very likely inspired by Bama to begin with. That's how much his work impacted the world. All of this came home to me recently while leafing through the pages of the book I recommend below. I hadn't noticed before, or perhaps lost sight of the fact of how inspiring the few pieces I'd seen of his over the years must have directed my eye. I don't ask that anyone else understand or agree with the connection. I'm only saying that's how I feel.

Read on dear friends -

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I HIGHLY recommend "James Bama - American Realist"

 

I've been waiting forever to get my hands on a collection of Bama's paperback book covers, Doc Savage, western's by Louis L'Amour, Zane Grey, etc . . . The classic Aurora Monster model kit boxes . . . Oh my God. I have a wonderful leather-bound, wooden slipcase edition of "The Western Art Of James Bama" which I've had for years and it's one of my treasures. But what I've always really wanted was the adventure stuff. I was born too late to be in on the whole Doc Savage phenomenon. I've only ever seen about a dozen of the 68 covers he did in the series, even have some lithographs, but this book has got it ALL. Man it's a wonder to behold. If you are an artist, believe me, you cannot live without this book.

 

You can get it here -------> http://budplant.com/product.asp?pn=JMH

 

An absolute STEAL in hardcover for $35.00

 

Be the best money you ever spent.

JamesBamaAmericanRealist.jpg

 

docsavagelg.jpg

 

A-Sioux-Indian-865x914.jpg

 

CheyenneDogSoldier.jpg

 

The work speaks for itself.

 

- TB

 

 

All I can say is DAY-UM!! I have never seen this guy's work before, but it is off the hook. That is freakin' awesome. I love that. I gotta look for some of his work. That's great.

 

mediumfan

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Guest AdminGuyX

I can stare at this man's work for days, weeks, years, and see new things every single time. It's mind boggeling how good it is. It's almost painful how good it is.

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Wow! I've seen these Doc Savage covers before and been in awe of the art - but never stopped to find out who did them. His covers keep popping up when I was googling 'pulp art.' Thank you, Tim. Now I know whose art it is that I've been saving to my hard-drive... :D

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