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Tim Bradstreet

Non-Mainstream Film

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Looper was excellent. Great performances, writing, direction etc. Like most time travel films you could easily nit-pick flaws in the logic, but that aside it's the smartest sci-fi film to come out of mainstream Hollywood in a long time.

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I loved Looper. Did not realize that the same guy made Brick. I was talking to a friend last night, and though there was not an overflow of Sci-Fi films, this was still a pretty good year for them. The few that came out were well done.

 

One of my favorite bits in Looper is when Bruce goes back and gets killed right away. He failed, but eventually if he waits 40 years, he can try again. I'm not sure if they were playing with eventualaity of fate, or the fact that as you age, you start to see things a bit diffrently. It's been a while since I've seen a film with Bruce where he was not phoning it in. It's sad when your headliner is one of your weakest links, but not so much here. Though, without question, JGL was all in. I can't wait to see what this guy does next.

 

PRIMER, man I kind of forgot about that one. It's really damn good. I remeber when the press was all over it saying it had the complexity of Kubrick and only a $7000 budget. It's a breath of fresh air when people can go out and do something smart and without using the Hollywood system.

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PRIMER, man I kind of forgot about that one. It's really damn good. I remeber when the press was all over it saying it had the complexity of Kubrick and only a $7000 budget. It's a breath of fresh air when people can go out and do something smart and without using the Hollywood system.

 

 

$7,000 budget!? Now, that is refreshingly independent. B)

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another really good time travel movie is 12 monkeys. it was willis at his best

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just watched two of my favs...enduring love with daniel craig and rhys ifan and after dark my sweet with jason patric and bruce dern. check them out if you get a chance

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Guest AdminGuyX

Yeah, primer was cool. I can't go into one of those massive storage buildings without thinking of that flick. :) I didn't know it was made for $7000!! LOVE THAT.

 

Looper was far better than I expected it to be. I had a gut feeling about JGL when I would watch 3rd rock from the sun. He was supposed to be a full grown alien in a kids body and he would have these moments of brilliance in the middle of crazy comedy writing, where you completely believed he was a grown soul in a child's body. After seeing him in Brick, and then The Lookout, I became a fan. He was pretty damn good in Killshot too. ;) But I'm very biased about Killshot.

 

and after dark my sweet

 

LOVE that film. But I'm a Bruce Dern fan. Have been since I saw The Driver when I was a kid. He's one of those incredibly comfortable and naturalistic actors that you just can't help but watch when he's on screen.

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Yeah, primer was cool. I can't go into one of those massive storage buildings without thinking of that flick. :) I didn't know it was made for $7000!! LOVE THAT.

 

Looper was far better than I expected it to be. I had a gut feeling about JGL when I would watch 3rd rock from the sun. He was supposed to be a full grown alien in a kids body and he would have these moments of brilliance in the middle of crazy comedy writing, where you completely believed he was a grown soul in a child's body. After seeing him in Brick, and then The Lookout, I became a fan. He was pretty damn good in Killshot too. ;) But I'm very biased about Killshot.

 

 

 

LOVE that film. But I'm a Bruce Dern fan. Have been since I saw The Driver when I was a kid. He's one of those incredibly comfortable and naturalistic actors that you just can't help but watch when he's on screen.

i'm gonna watch looper this afternoon. love killshot! thanks mr.jane...mickey is great in it too...if you know any matee indians like i do...he fuckin nails it!!! bruce dern is fantastic in just about anything he does...even in the burbs, funny fuck! jgl, the only thing i saw him in i didn't like was the dark knight rises. and that wasn't his fault...the movie was a pile of shit!

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looper was different than i expected, but really good! not bad for a film i didn't want to watch. saw lawless too today...good stuff! would love to see TJ and tom hardy in a film together! update...watched flight last night. it was alright, wasn't really alot to it? besides nobody likes quiter...thats a joke for those that have seen it ;)

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just bought a little film i love for a whopping$1.68! has anyone seen this, kill me again. it stars val kilmer, joanne whalley-kilmer and michael madsen.

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Any rules about not resurrecting old threads? If not, I have some great suggestions! However, first I'd just like to say that Romeo Lies Bleeding, The Passion of Darkly Noon, In Bruges, Solaris, Mosquito Coast, Crossroads, Night/Day Watch, Primer, Blind Fury ("Nice doggie!" ha ha), Bubba Hotep, Shallow Grave, Ghost Dog, Headhunters, Enduring Love, and Looper are all such great films! As is Dead Man. Speaking of Depp, I'd also add What's Eating Gilbert Grape (which I still regard as DiCaprio's finest performance) and The Brave.

There are a few suggestions I've never heard of, which is cool. You guys have such great taste!

 

Anyhow, this 'ere is my first suggestion...

The Happiness of the Katakuris

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Director: Takashi Miike
Writers: Ai Kennedy, Kikumi Yamagishi
Starring: Kenji Sawada, Keiko Matsuzaka, Shunji Takeda

Brief synopsis:
Bonkers musical comedy horror with dance routines, zommers, claymation, sing-a-long... and more. So much more!

A bit more in depth:
Newly-redundant guy decides to use his severance pay to buy a fixer-upper situated out of town on an old rubbish dump, and turn it into a BnB. When guests eventually begin to arrive, they have a habit of popping their clogs, which leaves the family with a bit of a dilemma. 

Oh, and there's a volcano too. And a dog - not a yakuza dog. 😋

Why I like it:
This is one of the films that early on in our relationship was suggested by my beloved, and convinced me that he was a keeper!

 

 

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Mike has done some great work but not heard of that will check it out.

One that was never brought up was the film "Manhunter" (1986) by Michael Mann which is hands down one of my all time favorite films and a true psychological thriller. Bit dated now and was in fact the first film to feature a certain cannibal doctor (Still think Brian Cox is better than Hopkins)

 The entire film is a trip into a personal hell for the lead profiler (brilliantly play by William Peterson) and he profiles and becomes consumed by the killer his is trying to catch (again played by the terrifying Tom Noonan - Who by the way in real life is a total scream and a real gentle giant!!)  

The film shows how his mind alters, how it affects his family, how he battles becoming obsessed and getting into the mind of the killer but also knows that what has to be done no matter the cost.

Clip below (SPOILERS)

https://youtu.be/xcPemp1-t-Y

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This thread is fantastic! Thanks for reviving it.

AMATEUR (1994)

Director: Hal Hartley

Cast: Isabelle Huppert, Martin Donovan, Elina Löwensohn, Damian Young

Summary (from IMDB): Isabelle is an ex-nun waiting for her special mission from God. In the meantime, she is making a living writing pornography. She meets Thomas, a sweet, confused amnesiac who cannot remember that he used to be a vicious pornographer, responsible for turning his young wife, Sofia, into the world's most notorious porn queen. Sofia's on the run, convinced she's killed him. Together, Isabelle and Thomas set out to discover his past, a past waiting to catch up with him.

Why I like it: please just re-read the five sentences above slowly.

Why I like it even more 1/4 : well, this movie actually really is about floppy discs. Wait... why are they called floppy? They're stiff. And why discs? They're square... Elina's script (here very badly rewritten by yours truly) is iconic for all nerds from the 90s. You can have a glimpse here and switch from one short video to the next https://getyarn.io/yarn-clip/77a5a9fd-402e-4d34-9d6d-31318b3ed48d

Why I like it even more 2/4 : each scene is like a painting. The frame, the decor, the colors. Everything is thought through and is so beautiful to look at. Isabelle Huppert gets all hot cuddling with a drilling machine. Damian Young gets a new haircut (no spoilers here!).

Why I like it even more 3/4 : the pace of the movie seems slow, the actors are given time to interact and the script is great. But at the end of the movie when you rethink about what you saw... so many things have happened in such a short time! This is non-stop action, with guns, data retrieval, defenestration, blood, hiding, pursuits, torture (a tiny bit. I don't like torture)...

Why I like it even more 4/4: my brother took me to the cinema with him to see it. I felt like I was arrived in the adult world.

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Will check it out. 

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I'm pretty sure I've not seen Manhunter, which is curious, given that Brian Cox is such a brilliant actor, and I am a big fan of the Hannibal TV series. I remember enjoying Silence of the Lambs when it was first released; at some point, I may actually watch all three films, in chronological order. I remember thinking that Anthony Hopkins was rather good in the role but how being used to Mads Mikkelsen, I wonder whether I'd still be impressed.

Amateur sounds very familiar. At first I thought that maybe I hadn't seen it but as I was reading the description, and your reasons for liking it, Ariane, I started to wonder whether I have in fact, watched it. I guess I'll just have to see if I can find it to see!

Ničija Zemlja (2001)
(No Man's Land)

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Director: Danis Tanović
Writer: Danis Tanović
Stars: Branko Đurić, Rene Bitorajac, Filip Šovagović

What's it about?
During the Yugoslav Wars (1991-2001), two Bosniaks (Čiki & Cera) and a Bosnian Serb (Nino) find themselves wounded in the same trench in No Man's Land. It transpires that Cera is lying unconscious on a Serbian land mine, which will detonate the minute he moves. Čiki and Nino start to throw insults at each other, eventually discovering they have some shared friends and experiences. Meanwhile, the UNPROFOR arrived but refuse to do anything to help until an English journalist turns up, and essentially blackmails them into action.

What this film means to me...
I first watched it in 2007, and was incredibly moved by the very human story (especially the ending); however, it wasn't until we went to live in Rijeka (Croatia) in late 2015, that I re-watched it, and felt its full impact.

One day, deciding to do the tourist thing, K and I visited Rastoke - a beautiful, fairytale village a couple of hours east of us. Instead of driving on the main roads, we went across country. We drove through a couple of run-down villages, and didn't think anything of it, and then suddenly, we saw a burned out shell of a house. And then another. And then another. And then fields cordoned off with bright yellow tape which declared there were live land mines in the area.

20 years after the war had ended, there were still landmines. In the fields where people used to grow their food. 

As we drove into the centre of the village, we saw the rest of the houses (and the pub). It was chilling; hundreds of bullet holes around every window and doorway, and on the ceilings too. They weren't there by accident; they had been aimed at people who were, presumably, firing out of the windows and doors. The census before the start of the war listed something like 490 people living in Primišlje - as of 2015, there were just four. 

I'm assuming that most people evacuated but I don't know. I also don't know whether the people inside the buildings were Croats defending their homeland, or whether the JNA had occupied the village, and the Croats showed up to get rid of them. I don't know whether the people fighting were all adults, or whether some were child soldiers. There were children taking up arms on most sides. I don't know who put the landmines in the fields, nor whether they will ever be removed. I do know that standing in the middle of that desolate village had a profound effect upon me. I didn't know anyone involved in what happened there, I had no personal connection to the place, and yet, just standing there, and seeing the evidence of so much violence moved me to tears. I just broke down. Five years later, that feeling is still with me. 

The following year, we moved to Belgrade, where Serbian nationalism is rife. Most people we came across were perfectly normal people, as you'd find anywhere. Some were completely lovely, and almost everyone was friendly and helpful. However, due to that nationalist element, in the city centre, you'll see market stalls selling children's tee shirts emblazoned with portraits of Milošević, Mladić, and Karadžić, with the slogan, "Serbian war hero". These are sold alongside tee shirts with Trump's and Putin's faces on them. More heroes.

Having lived in three former Yugo countries (plus, visited Bosnia), and spoken at length to friends from all four countries, I have a much greater understanding of No Man's Land. I find it to be an incredible film, I really do.

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BEYOND THE BLACK RAINBOW

Panos Cosmatos, 2010

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A paranoia manifesto by Panos Cosmatos, son of George Cosmatos of FIRST BLOOD PART 2 fame. Panos followed this up last year with the Cagefest MANDY which I felt did not live entirely up to the promise he gave with his debut.

BEYOND THE BLACK RAINBOW ist not for moviegoers who want a good and clear story narrative. Its vague references to the Reagan era and the Noriega affair in particular feel rather put-on. This film is all about mood, atmosphere and visuals. And the visuals are absolutely breathtaking. The sets are stunning, glowing walls and rooms, cold and menacing but unbelievably stylish. As the film is set in the early 80s, there is a fabulous analogue synth score throughout, conceived by the keyboarder of the band Black Mountain. It all feels like being captured in a feverish dream that you just can't wake up from. 

The film almost blows it with an all-too literate finale, but thankfully that's not enough to diminish this unique cinematic experience. It reminded me of the times when David Lynch or David Cronenberg were still really really weird.  It is a very slow film, but if you are open to let yourself be caught up in it, you probably will find the experience most rewarding.

 

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Will check this one out. I enjoyed Mandy but had nothing to compare it too from his other work. 

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