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FURY

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Guest AdminGuyX

I don't know how many of our members here got out to see this WWII tanker flick, but I found it a nice companion piece to films like Saving Private Ryan. It's a dark film. The characters are never really happy or relaxed. I would not say it has any good guys or bad guys. It's not a good vs. evil depiction of the war. Less about the "horrors" of war and more about the men who survive those horrors and the toll it takes on them.

 

The film has a great cast, and they make the film immersive and interesting. For a 2 hour plus film, it went by really fast. The film was over before I knew it and I found myself thinking about it a lot afterwards. I've never seen combat, but there was a time in my life that I was very prepared to fight and die for my country in the first Iraq war. I enlisted with intentions of trying out for special forces, but for health reasons was unable to go into active duty. Movies like Fury stir up a lot of the questions I had about myself when I was young, and I would contemplate what combat would be like for me.

 

Also, the film has a great low key score. The music of the film, I found, to be seamless with the mood and story. There is a scene with a German sniper, and the music was just perfect.

 

With Sabotage aside (which I liked parts of) I really enjoy the films David Ayer is making. I think most film buffs took notice of him after Training Day, which he wrote. But he has a pretty impressive resume. He's directing Suicide Squad next, so it'll be interesting to see his take on some of the DC villians, and the world of DC super heroes. I think he's a good choice for that film.

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I really dug this film. I went to go see it the same day as John Wick. Both really good films, but Fury was the better of the two. John Wick by the way is a pretty damn good action flick. It's not brain dead like so many. Back to Fury:

 

There were two scenes that really stood out of me, both not action scenes (though, the action scenes are pretty amazing). The first one was when Brad Pitt's character made Logan Lerman's character kill his first German. Just before this, they had been in a squirmish becasue Lerman did not kill a Nazi Youth because it was a kid, and it ended up with a tank getting destroyed and some pretty horrific deaths. At first you just see Pitt as a heartless bastard, but you start to see why he is doing it. It all comes full circle in the second scene in a German town, where Pitt takes Lerman to an apartment and they find a couple of young women. It's long scene, but when the rest of the tank crew crash their quiet, I think you really get a feel for what war can do to a person.

 

After getting out of the film, my cousin was spouting off how he wouldn't care if it was a kid, he would shoot on sight. I get what he was saying, especially since Vietnam and the era of live coverage of war. I don't think up to that point people really understood what evil men are capable of, and using a child as a weapon is nothing new.

 

My cousin, being a big war buff and knowing kids are used all the time to kill, and not ever having been around children himself, I feel it's easy for him to say that. I would like to think that me being in that situation, I would take the shot, but I know deep down inside, I might not be able to without hesitation or even at all. Lerman's character was a desk jocky, not someone trained to be out in battle. This film did pretty good at showing diffrent aspects of what it's like not just to be in war, but the effects of taking another person's life. It does not come without a toll.

 

My first brother to come back from boot camp said the hardest part of training for him was not the gas chamber, like so many say, but having to shoot at cut-out targets of children. Even knowing it was not real, he said it is pretty un-nerving.

 

I have a lot of family and friends in the armed services, a few of whom have seen action and killed. We get together at the holidays, laugh and have a good time. We watch our kids play together, but there is something missing. It's not something you can outright see, but when I spend a few minutes with them, it is apparent. I see these men and women who serve our country, who give up so much of their life and I have nothing but respect for them. I don't think I could do it myself.

 

One of my cousins is in the documentary The Hornet's Nest (only for a few seconds. The unit he lead was in the city of the final battle and not with the journalist). It's a hard watch. Not only because you get a real sense of the danger our solider's are in, but because you get to see how sencless war can be at times. I will admit there were times I was tearing up pretty good.

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Guest AdminGuyX

Yeah, I have a lot of friends and family in the service too. I grew up with 2 brothers who fought in Vietnam as marines, so there was always a lot of discussion about the subject of what it's like to be in the military. The impression I got though, was that only 1 of my brothers had ever killed a person in combat. I never discussed it with either of them. Now a lot of my buddies from high school have either been active for 20 years, or they have gone back to civilian life to be with their family. But I know a few of them have seen serious combat.

 

I'll have to look up Hornet's Nest. I like seeing truthful documentaries about combat.

 

I agree with your selection of favorite scenes too. The scene with the girls, and the eggs was just a fantastic exploration of character and performance. I loved it. The guys crashing into the meal was interesting for so many reasons. The jealousy they had at WarDaddy choosing to spend time with Lerman/Machine. Being drunk, and not considering that maybe he needed time to be a normal person. And I think, ultimately they wanted that too. I also thought it was interesting that Gordo and Coon would choose to have sex with that lady in the tank. That was the safe place in the middle of the war for them.

 

On the subject of killing a child during combat, I have always said the same as your cousin. I would not hesitate. I suspect for a different reason. When I was younger I was a much colder person than I am now. More deliberate. Less caring. Much less empathetic. It was just part of the job I was ready to perform.

 

Today, the situation where I would find myself faced with the decision to shoot a teenager is different. It's a long story, but when I lived in Atlanta I found myself in the middle of a gang shootout outside of my home. I was armed, I was ready to kill. I knew it would likely have been a kid. I'm the kind of person who has worked hard for the little I have, I love my family. It's an easy choice for me. I don't think I would hesitate.

 

I've lived in lots of cities. I was as prepared for home invasions and break in as possible. Mentally speaking, but I also usually have a good security system in our house. I would not have a problem shooting an intruder.

 

I live in the country now. But I still keep a weapon close. Home invasions are super rare up here, but meth is a big drug around here and I'm aware it can bring a person to do something stupid. I still enjoy training though, and there is some great places to do that here.

 

Back to Fury. Scott Eastwood had a small role. He's Clint's oldest son, and he looks a lot like his dad. I watched for him, I wanted to see his screen presence. I'm not sure if it was just the script, but he never made an impression. He was there and gone quickly.

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I thought there would be more with him, and I am guessing there is more that ended up on the cutting room floor. Pitt did an interview where he said that Shia and himself almost go into a fight with Scott because he was spitting chew in the tank. When he confronted him, Scott said he did it because it was in the script. I did not see that in the film.

 

On a side note, not that I expect every actor to know their scripts inside and out, but being a producer, I was a little shocked that Pitt did not know that before hand. Although, a lot of producers are by name only. And don't get me wrong, I'm not knocking Pitt. I dig his work. He also comes off as a pretty cool guy. I loved the comentary he did with Fincher and Norton on Fight Club.

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Guest AdminGuyX

The story struck me the same way when I read about it. Think about how Scott Eastwood must have felt. His father has a reputation for being one of the most prepared, calm, and intelligent directors in the business, and the film's producer and star doesn't even know the damn script?

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