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Tim Bradstreet

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I feel that way about another film score, the same way you can't imagine anyone else composing that of Taxi Driver's. Godfather. Who else but Carmine Coppola and Nino Rota coulda done that? Just the intro with that puppet master hand in white. I remember walking into Virgin in Orlando, and seeing this really impressive shot of Pacino on a cd. he had a fedora on...

 

godfatheriicdrv5.jpg

 

Bought it immediately.

 

I think Coppola really knows how to pick his composers. One of the first scores I ever bought was Apocalypse Now. Rumble Fish also has a haunting score.

 

-TL

 

 

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I need to get that damn score for Cape Fear.

JO

 

Good luck. That sumbitch is so out of print it's silly.

You can still find affordable copies of Elmer Bernstein's version of the same Herrmann score which was used for the 1991 Scorsese remake. It's better than nothing, in fact, it's pretty awesome. The title track from the original Cape Fear is available on Itunes as part of a Herrmann compilation CD. Just search Itunes for "Bernard Herrmann".

 

- TB

 

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Gonna check that out.

I'll pick it up there if I can't get a hold of a hard copy.

 

Anyone have some German language skills out there?

I have a smattering and can make out some of the words in the below titles but I would love a full translation.

Thanks a ton in advance - Ahem, obviously I don't need translations for the track listings that are in English ALREADY.

Some a you smart-asses . . . ;)

 

Track listing for Nosferatu, by Popol Vuh

 

1. Brüder des Schattens

2. Höre, der du wagst

3. Das Schloss des Irrtums

4. Die Umkehr

5. Mantra 1

6. Morning Sun

7. Venus Principle

8. Mantra 2

9. Die Nacht der Himmel

10. Der Ruf der Rohrflöte

11. To a little Way

12. Through Pain to Heaven

13. On the Way

14. Zwiesprache der Rohrflöte

 

- TB

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If you're a fan of Jerry Fielding (The Outlaw Josey Wales, The Wild Bunch) then you'll love this new limited edition release from Screen Archives and Intrada.

 

From Screen Archives - http://www.screenarchives.com/title_detail.cfm?ID=8311#

 

8311.jpg

 

THE MECHANIC (CD)

Jerry Fielding

 

Limited to 1500

World premiere 1972 release of complete Jerry Fielding score for Michael Winner thriller takes all 27 minutes of music from earlier albums, then offers additional 50 minutes of music previously unreleased! Fielding takes cue from methodical hitman played by Charles Bronson, creates incredibly complex work for orchestra. Chilling tone clusters for piano, knife jabs for brass, startling percussion... and cold, cerebral strings spell Fielding at his most intense! But composer is calculated, adds tiny wisp of warmth, keeps everything just out of balance. Intrada CD presents entire score from original multi-track stereo session masters, courtesy of MGM. CD also includes exciting big band source cues composer wrote for film plus alternate end titles. Authoritative text from director/composer expert Nick Redman plus musical analysis from FSM's Lukas Kendall illuminates every complicated moment! Arguably Fielding's most dramatic work! Jerry Fielding conducts. Intrada Special Collection release limited to 1500 copies! - Douglass Fake, Intrada Producer

 

1. Main Title (3:21)

2. The Mark Comes Home; The Big Wait (4:33)

3. The Meeting (1:55)

4. Special Delivery; How’s My Pulse; Strange Feelings (1:33)

5. Death of McKenna (3:02)

6. The Letter (1:56)

7. Suicide (4:39)

8. Strange Madness; Hello Steve (2:12)

9. The Mechanic (1:27)

10. The Pick Up; No Way In (1:56)

11. Never Ride a Motorbike; The Man (8:11)

12. Revelation; Italian Job (4:33)

13. Watching – Waiting (2:54)

14. The Set Up (1:53)

15. Speed Boats (1:04)

16. The Big Chase; The Big Drop (4:21)

17. Steve Takes Over (0:58)

18. End Titles – Version 2 (Bang, You’re Dead) (0:50)

Score Time = 51:05

 

Bonus Tracks – Source Music Supervised by Jerry Fielding

19. [slate 1M2] Beethoven: String Quartet No. 6, Op. 18 (2:12)

20. [slate 3M1] Beethoven: String Quartet No. 6, Op. 18 (1:01)

21. O Sole Mio (Music by Eduardo di Capua/Lyrics by Giovanni Capurro) (1:10)

Source Music Time = 4:27

 

Bonus Tracks – Alternate End Titles

22. End Titles – Version 1 (Bang, You’re Dead) (1:04)

23. End Titles – Version 3 (Bang, You’re Dead) (0:42)

Alternate End Titles Time = 1:48

 

Bonus Tracks – Jerry Fielding Big Band Source Music

24. Let’s Get Together Again (6:12)

25. Baja Band (Mexico Jazz) (4:03)

26. The Party (2:27)

27. Beach House Jump (1:38)

28. Smoked Salmon (2:10)

29. Romping (3:09)

Big Band Source Music Time = 19:51

 

As I mentioned before, you can find all kinds of CRAZY AWEsome limited edition scores over there. Right now they have a 2-disc re-issue of "The Wind And The Lion" by Jerry Goldsmith. It's the complete score! Also . . . Alien was out of print forever. You could only get that Alien Trilogy re-recording by Cliff Eidelman if you wanted to have it unless you wanted to pay huge bucks. I picked up a real nice bootleg of the Alien complete score about 8 years ago but NOW anyone can get it. The new reissue has the complete recordings on 2 CD's plus rescored alternate tracks and bonus tracks! All by the indomidable, legendary maestro himself, Jerry Goldsmith.

Don't be a rube, you KNOW you gotta have it.

 

The Wind And The Lion - 2-Disc complete Score - http://www.screenarchives.com/title_detail.cfm?ID=7782

Alien - 2-Disc Complete Score - http://www.screenarchives.com/title_detail.cfm?ID=8251

 

- TB

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scan0001-1.jpg

 

 

This is another of my all-time favorite movie soundtracks (from one of my all-time favorite movies). Not only does it have a great Bernard Hermann track, Twisted Nerve, (whistled, no less), but the Luis Bacalov score, The Grand Duel (Parte Prima) is absolutely brilliant, beautiful, and haunting. It perfectly suits the dark, vengeful theme of The Bride's mission, and the climactic confrontation between the Bride and Oren Ishii, played out against the backdrop of this score is almost lyrical and poetic.

 

It also has one of the best pieces of dialogue written by Quentin f-ing Tarantino (outside of True Romance, that is) - Oren Ishii's speech, The Queen of the Crime Council.

 

"Now if ANY of you sons-of-bitches got ANYthing else to say, NOW'S THE FUCKIN' TIME!"

 

Also ya gotta dig Isaac Hayes, Al Hirt, Quincy Jones and the homage to the classic 70's Japanese kung fu flicks. All of the music on this one is great, imo. Especially love the Japanese influences of The 5,6,7,8's (Woo Hoo) and Tomoyasu Hotei and Meiko Kaji, among others. If you haven't listened to this one, you should check it out.

 

 

Mediumfan

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Gonna check that out.

I'll pick it up there if I can't get a hold of a hard copy.

 

Anyone have some German language skills out there?

I have a smattering and can make out some of the words in the below titles but I would love a full translation.

Thanks a ton in advance - Ahem, obviously I don't need translations for the track listings that are in English ALREADY.

Some a you smart-asses . . . ;)

 

Track listing for Nosferatu, by Popol Vuh

 

1. Brüder des Schattens

2. Höre, der du wagst

3. Das Schloss des Irrtums

4. Die Umkehr

5. Mantra 1

6. Morning Sun

7. Venus Principle

8. Mantra 2

9. Die Nacht der Himmel

10. Der Ruf der Rohrflöte

11. To a little Way

12. Through Pain to Heaven

13. On the Way

14. Zwiesprache der Rohrflöte

 

- TB

 

 

1 . Brothers of the shade

2. Hear, which you dare

3. The lock of the mistake

4. The reversal

5. Mantra 1

6. Morning Sun

7. Venus Principle

8. Mantra 2

9. The night of the skies

10. The call of the tubing flute

11. To A little Way

12. Through Pain to Heaven

13. On the Way

14. Zwiesprache of the tubing flute

 

Tim, this may not be 100% accurate. I don't speak German either, but this is the closest I could get it. I cheated a little and used an online translator so if it isn't accurate, sorry. Hope that helps.

 

mediumfan

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Yep, both "Kill Bill" soundtracks are A1.

Never been a fan of the RZA but he produced an extraordinary collection of goodies here in association with Tarantino.

I'm a HUGE Bacalov fan and many (here in the states) who were stuck in perpetual Ennio Morricone adoration were finally introduced to the other guy who created incredible Spaghetti Western scores. Morricone with Leone, Bacalov with Sergio Corbucci.

 

"Django (1966)" is one of my all time favorites. Herrmann, Bacalov, Morricone, ZAMFIR, Quincy Jones, Johnny Cash (KBII), how can you go wrong? BOTH soundtracks are asstacular.

 

- TB

 

PS - Thanks a mil for the translations!

Any Deutschlanders out there feel free to make corrections ;)

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Just finished watching Heath Ledger's Ned Kelly. Klaus Badelt's score is fantastic, and the closing song sets the mood for the annihalistic feeling the film leaves you with.

 

-TL

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Yep, both "Kill Bill" soundtracks are A1.

Never been a fan of the RZA but he produced an extraordinary collection of goodies here in association with Tarantino.

I'm a HUGE Bacalov fan and many (here in the states) who were stuck in perpetual Ennio Morricone adoration were finally introduced to the other guy who created incredible Spaghetti Western scores. Morricone with Leone, Bacalov with Sergio Corbucci.

 

"Django (1966)" is one of my all time favorites. Herrmann, Bacalov, Morricone, ZAMFIR, Quincy Jones, Johnny Cash (KBII), how can you go wrong? BOTH soundtracks are asstacular.

 

- TB

 

PS - Thanks a mil for the translations!

Any Deutschlanders out there feel free to make corrections ;)

 

Actually, I've never gotten around to buying the KBII soundtrack. It's been on my wish list for a while, just haven't gotten to it yet. I will though. Love Bacalov though, and what RZA did with this soundtrack is fantastic. And like you said, with all those guys, how could you go wrong? I'm not real big on Zamfir though. I can take him in small doses. But I just love the electic mix on this CD and all of it suits the movie so well. While it's not a true film score, it's still a great collection and always makes me think of scenes from the movie. The fight scene in the snow, the bloodbath in the church, etc. I guess that's what a really good film score is supposed to do in a sense. Whenever I hear the Indiana Jones or Star Wars themes, I automatically get a visual in my mind of something from the movies. I can't help it.

 

Mediumfan

 

p.s. You're welcome for the translations. Hope it helped.

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Good luck. That sumbitch is so out of print it's silly.

You can still find affordable copies of Elmer Bernstein's version of the same Herrmann score which was used for the 1991 Scorsese remake. It's better than nothing, in fact, it's pretty awesome. The title track from the original Cape Fear is available on Itunes as part of a Herrmann compilation CD. Just search Itunes for "Bernard Herrmann".

 

- TB

 

Ack! Well that Herrmann compilation on Itunes is not the original recording either.

It's the City Of Prague Philharmonic, not sure who is conducting.

After checking with sources I found that the original recording was never released.

Maybe someday.

Until then we'll have to live with Bernstein's wonderful re-recording from '91.

 

- TB

 

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Just finished watching Heath Ledger's Ned Kelly. Klaus Badelt's score is fantastic, and the closing song sets the mood for the annihalistic feeling the film leaves you with.

 

-TL

 

Ned Kelly is hands down my favorite score by Klaus Badelt. I paid way too much money for it because at the time it was only available as an import. Worth the money though.

 

While it's not a true film score, it's still a great collection and always makes me think of scenes from the movie.

 

Mediumfan - I'm glad you bring up the subject of what a film score truly is. I referred to KBI and II as a soundtrack since it's a collection of music (also with dialogue, etc), even though all that music is from the film, some via other films. I'd call the "Payback" stuff a soundtrack as well since it intermixes actual songs (Ain't That A Kick In The Head) along with the 4 score tracks by Boardman (which are not nearly enough). Unless a CD is 80-100% score I call it a soundtrack. I hate when people call scores, soundtracks, because I believe there is a definite difference. I don't think its being nitpicky, it's just more accurate.

 

It's like when someone says, "Hey, you got the soundtrack to Blade?" I say no, cause I could care less about the soundtrack to Blade. I DO have the score by Mark Isham though, and it's sensational.

Am I being a snob about it? Fuck no, 'cause there is a difference!

;)

 

- TB

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I'm not real big on Zamfir though. I can take him in small doses.

 

And a small dose is exactly what we got, and it was perfect!

 

When the world's undisputed MASTER of the Pan Flute gets invited to the party, you have to make sure you get him outta there after ONE tune. Otherwise folks'll scream for Jim Jones to start pouring the Kool-Aid.

And you don't want that!

 

beverage-Kool-Aid.jpg

 

- TB

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That grandma pic is priceless.

 

I agree with you on the proper vocabulary for scores and soundtracks. A score IS very different from a soundtrack. Marketing for soundtracks I don't think existed before Prince's Batman companion cd aka the "soundtrack".

 

Talkin Payback, I like both cuts because they feel like two different films. I was surprised to hear you're not a Kristofferson fan. Big Top Pee Wee was the shit! No, seriously - he's not bad in my opinion. I don't look for him though, when he shows up (like in Steven Seagal's Fire Down Below) I usually enjoy the guy. I think his Bronson character (properly named after our man Chuck B.) was the perfect final ingredient to Payback. That and the uncredited uncalled for appearance by James Coburn. Anyway here's what I was getting to, I think I prefer the original Gibson 1999 cut because of the tone that's set by the score. Its such a fuckin McQueen movie! And hearing B.B. King's Thrill is Gone and James Brown's This is a Man's Man's Man's World was just refreshing. Movies today oughtta be like that man. The scene that really blows me away, is when Gregg Henry's character waits for Porter by the phonebooth. Gibson slowly reveals himself and Hendrix's Voodoo Child starts roaring as he walks into the trap. Those musical selections make that cut of Payback THAT much more enjoyable to me.

 

Scott Stambler's score to the Straight Up cut though, is equally great in a different way. Its an Eastwood movie. Dry and cold. Dirty fuckin Harry.

 

Which goes back to the thought that Gibson's cut was a Peckinpah film and Helgeland's cut was a Siegel film.

 

-TL

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The Crow really suprised me. The film was great and it had a great score and soundtrack. Sad that it was Brandon Lee's last film & I still suspect foul play. But the score is great.

All the sequels were pure bullshit.

 

Tim, did you ever read Rob Zombie's script for The Crow:2037? I thought if another film for The Crow should have been made, it should have been it. Especially since Christopher Lee was goin' to be involved as the villian.

 

Shadow Of The Vampire by Daniel I. Jones is a great score. I loved the film as well. Willem Dafoe is the main and I love the myth that Max Schreck was in fact a vampire.

 

Mystic River also had a very challenging score. Clint Eastwood & his son, Kyle, wrote the score and performed some it themselves and some of it is performed by other composers.

 

Million Dollar Baby by Clint Eastwood is a score that fit the film nicely. I was suprised that Clint was bustin' out all these. He's doin' a good job.

 

JO

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I'd say 80% of Mystic River is Lennie Niehaus. Its sad to see they included the score with the 3 dvd box set for the actual film.

 

Million Dollar Baby was good, but I think too subtle. It fits though. Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil had a great score.

 

WORST SCORE EVER: Batman Forever. It shoulda been called ROADKILL.

 

-TL

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I'd say 80% of Mystic River is Lennie Niehaus. Its sad to see they included the score with the 3 dvd box set for the actual film.

 

Million Dollar Baby was good, but I think too subtle. It fits though. Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil had a great score.

 

WORST SCORE EVER: Batman Forever. It shoulda been called ROADKILL.

 

-TL

Worst films ever was the last two batman films. They sucked. God they sucked. The score's just added to the bs that was called batman.

 

Midnight in the Garden of Good & Evil was an excellent score. Good performances also.

 

TL have you heard the score to Creepshow by John Harrison? The film is great but the score is really good. You even hear movies today copying the subtle tones.

 

JO

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Creepshow was the shit. its fuckin creepy as hell. But the SCARIEST score has to be the Exorcist. I fear that fuckin film. Refuse to buy it. Yet I saw it in the theatres while in high school and crapped myself while sleeping over a girlfriend's house that night.

 

-TL

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Creepshow was the shit. its fuckin creepy as hell. But the SCARIEST score has to be the Exorcist. I fear that fuckin film. Refuse to buy it. Yet I saw it in the theatres while in high school and crapped myself while sleeping over a girlfriend's house that night.

 

-TL

Yeah, love Creepshow. Man, I just watched the Version You Never Seen: The Exorcist. That was fuckin' crazy. It was so intense man & it really gets to you. The score is some scary shit and the performances in the film were so good. That film was a revolution about like Polanski's Rosemary's Baby which also had a creepy fuckin' score.

 

Videodrome has one hellova score. It's creepy, raw, new yet it was made back in the early 80's.

 

I agree on the Payback score. That is one badass score.

 

JO

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Mediumfan - I'm glad you bring up the subject of what a film score truly is. I referred to KBI and II as a soundtrack since it's a collection of music (also with dialogue, etc), even though all that music is from the film, some via other films. I'd call the "Payback" stuff a soundtrack as well since it intermixes actual songs (Ain't That A Kick In The Head) along with the 4 score tracks by Boardman (which are not nearly enough). Unless a CD is 80-100% score I call it a soundtrack. I hate when people call scores, soundtracks, because I believe there is a definite difference. I don't think its being nitpicky, it's just more accurate.

 

It's like when someone says, "Hey, you got the soundtrack to Blade?" I say no, cause I could care less about the soundtrack to Blade. I DO have the score by Mark Isham though, and it's sensational.

Am I being a snob about it? Fuck no, 'cause there is a difference!

 

 

- TB

 

You're absolutely right, TB. That's why I said that I am not as serious as you guys when it come to film scores and composers. I have a small ( and growing) collection of scores, and a larger collection of soundtracks. I have my favorite composers as I mentioned above, and I listen to their works, but I also like soundtracks, because you can get some great compilations on them, and you can get songs on a soundtrack that you might not find anywhere else.

 

But there is a definite difference between an actual film score and a soundtrack. No, you're not being a snob about it. It's just apples and oranges, that's all.

 

Speaking of, here's another really good one.

 

scan0002.jpg

 

I'll call this one a soundtrack, because it does have a few songs on it, but it's about 60% score by Billy Corgan and Mike Garson. And it's beautiful. Eerie and yet, at times, it is pounding and intense. Again, well suited to the movie. A very good score, and soundtrack.

 

 

mediumfan

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Tom Hiel is credited with the score but I see no listing for it.

Were you referring to the music soundtrack?

- TB

Tim, I wrote to the man at the customer service of the site. He says the Tom Hiel Soundtrack to Swimming With Sharks is actually the score so that would be the one I'm speaking of. Good deal.

 

JO

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