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ARONOFSKY'S THE WRESTLER


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This has to be one of the greatest interviews I have ever witnessed with Rourke!

 

30 Minutes with Mickey Rourke

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Nice article this week in ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY with Mickey Rourke. It's well worth the read...but I'd love to have heard the whole thing live before it was edited and censored!

 

 

ditto.

 

he's so humbled now.

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I was lucky enough to see THE WRESTLER at a Q & A screening with the film's writer Robert Siegel two weeks ago.

 

The film is very good and brought back fond memories of watching the WWF as a kid. It's a total character piece, plot takes a back seat, and it's shot documentary style, following this broken man around 20 years after his prime as he struggles to make a living. It's Darren Aronofsky's most accessible film, but it's still going to be challenged at the box office.

 

Mickey Rourke really delivers as Randy "The Ram" Robinson. He's heartbreaking. I've heard a lot of Oscar talk, but I think he will really be a dark horse contender. As much as I love Rocky, this isn't Rocky. It's not a crowd pleaser. But hopefully Mickey will get the nod.

 

Marisa Tomei is wonderful and VERY naked in this flick. She plays a stripper who is in her 40s and considered over the hill. (Though if she's over the hill, that's where I want to be. She still looks amazing.) She's a sad character struggling to make a living with her body, much like Randy.

 

I'm a huge Evan Rachel Wood fan and she does not disappoint as Randy's daughter. Their relationship and how things play out is definitely not predictable.

 

THE WRESTLER is full of great '80s metal music and there's a wonderful scene where Randy comments on how the '90s killed that music.

 

While I would hesitate to call THE WRESTLER great, it's solid and did not disappoint. My eyes were glued to the screen until the last frame and I highly recommend it. I saw it with my friend Jordan Raskin and we had a lot to talk about after seeing the flick.

 

For those of you in L.A., Film Independent is hosting a screening on 12/15 with a Q&A set to include Aronofsky, Mickey Rourke, Marisa Tomei, Evan Rachel Wood and Scott Franklin. There will also be a reception after the flick. You have to be a Film Independent member, but it's worth it for events like this one.

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Can't remember if this has been posted or not but here's a link to the HD trailer A

I really can't wait to see this. I get teary-eyed and emotional just watching this -------> The Wrestler - "A" Trailer HD

 

Go Mickey, GO!

 

I'm rooting for Mickey to take Oscar Gold.

 

- TB

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Nice article this week in ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY with Mickey Rourke. It's well worth the read...but I'd love to have heard the whole thing live before it was edited and censored!

 

 

I just traked down a copy. Totally agree with you, the whole interveiw would have been great. Mickey really came out in this one. It's heartbreaking to see how harsh he can be on himself. I feel bad for the guy, I'm glad to see things are looking like they are on the way back up.

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Fox Searchlight has announced the initial listing of cities that Darren Aronofsky’s The Wrestler will begin to roll-out into starting on December 17th. The cities and dates are tenative, and are subject to change.

Wednesday, December 17th

Los Angeles

New York

Friday, December 26th

Boston

Chicago

San Francisco

Washington, D.C.

Friday, January 9th

Austin

Dallas/Ft. Worth

Denver

Detroit

Hartford/New Haven

Minneapolis

Philadelphia

Phoenix

San Diego

Seattle

 

More after the jump.

 

Friday, January 16th

Albany

Albuquerque

Atlanta

Baltimore

Boca Raton/West Palm Beach

Cincinnati

Cleveland

Columbus

Honolulu

Houston

Indianapolis

Kansas City

Las Vegas

Madison

Miami/Ft. Lauderdale

Milwaukee

Northampton/Springfield

Orlando

Portland

Rochester

Sacramento

Salt Lake City/Boise

St. Louis

 

Friday, January 23rd

Anchorage

Asheville

Baton Rouge

Birmingham

Buffalo

Champaign/Decatur/Springfield

Charlotte

Charlottesville

Colorado Springs

Corpus Christi

Dayton

Des Moines

Ft. Myers

Gainesville

Grand Rapids

Harrisburg, PA

Ithaca

Jacksonville

Knoxville

Lansing

Lexington

Lousiville

Memphis

Nashville

New Orleans

Norfolk/Newport News

Oklahoma City

Omaha

Pittsburgh

Portland, ME

Providence

Raleigh/Durham

Reno

Richmond

San Antonio

Santa Fe

Sarasota

Spokane

Syracuse

Tallahassee

Tampa/St. Petersburg

Tucson

Tulsa

 

Source: http://www.slashfilm.com/2008/12/09/the-wr...-date-schedule/

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Iranian media has condemned Darren Aronofsky’s The Wrestler, claiming that it shows the West’s ignorance and prejudice towards Iran. The scene in question

is where Mickey Rourke, who plays Randy “The Ram” Robinson, has to fight Earnest “The Cat” Miller, who plays a character named The Ayatollah, who dresses in Middle Eastern garb and waves the Iranian flag before attacking Robinson with the pole. What the Iran press don’t seem to understand is that The Ram and The Ayatollah are wrestlers from the 1980’s wrestling boom.

 

The Ayatollah is clearly a fictional take of The Iron Sheik, a popular wrestler in the 1980’s who drew heat from the real-life politics of the time, notably the Iran hostage crisis, and the animosity Americans had for the country of Iran. Was it politically correct? Hell no, but we weren’t living in politically correct times.

 

The film begins in modern times, and The Ayatollah is no longer a wrestler, but instead a used car dealership owner. The match in question is a 20th anniversary rematch. So in other words, these are two cartoon characters from the 1980’s, who are returning to the ring for one last go, one last payday. It would make no sense to present a politically correct Iranian professional wrestler, because that is not what wrestling gimmicks of the 1980’s were all about. I feel stupider for responding to this claim, but I felt it needed to be said.

 

Source: http://www.slashfilm.com/2008/12/14/iran-c...s-the-wrestler/

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I've got 2 more days to go! December 17th in NYC!!!

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One of the first things most people notice about Darren Aronofsky’s The Wrestler is the authenticity of the the situations and the performance of the main character Randy “The Ram” Robinson, played by Mickey Rourke.

 

Having had a background of involvement in the behind the scenes during the second pro wrestling boom (Austin, The Rock..etc), I was amazed at the authenticity of the pro-wrestling subculture. From the fanny packs to the locker room before an indie show, the film has the most realistic depiction of the business that I’ve ever seen (aside from maybe the documentary Beyond the Mat, which is also wonderful and you should seek out).

 

Vulture was able to talk to former WWF World, Hardcore and ECW/WCW/WWF Tag Team champion (and New York Times bestselling author) Mick Foley (who was also known as “Mankind”, “Cactus Jack” and “Dude Love”). So what did a real pro wrestler think of The Wrestler?

Continue reading:

http://www.slashfilm.com/2008/12/16/former...s-the-wrestler/

 

A little over twenty years ago, actor Mickey Rourke was at the top of his game, giving critically acclaimed performances in movies like Barfly and 9 1/2 Weeks and Angel Heart and destined to be a Hollywood movie star on par with Bruce Willis in terms of his potential. Then something happened, much of it revolving around the reputation Rourke created for himself of being difficult to work with. By 1991, Rourke had decided to give up acting in favor of returning to his first love as a trained boxer, though he'd eventually return for small roles in movies by Robert Rodriguez and Tony Scott, and reminding everyone of his greatness when Rodriguez hired him to play Marv in Frank Miller's Sin City.

 

A few years on, Rourke is having what many are considering his comeback in Darren Aronofsky's The Wrestler in which he plays Randy "The Ram" Robinson, a wrestler twenty years past his prime who is trying to continue making a living in the ring despite health problems that might kill him if he continues. As Randy recovers from a heart attack, he bonds with his estranged daughter (Evan Rachel Wood) and an attractive and caring stripper (Marisa Tomei).

 

Rourke is far from past his prime, but there are so many parallels between the characters one can't help but feel that the actor was drawing from something within himself or his own past when creating the character of Randy "The Ram."

 

We heard a little from Rourke during the press conference at the New York Film Festival, but at the recent junket in New York, we were able to find out a little more from the veteran actor about the role and how he's handling being rediscovered by those who thought his career was over.

Continue reading:

http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=51289

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Got to see it again last night and it definitely holds up to a second viewing. The Film Independent screening was followed by a Q & A with Darren Aronofsky, Mickey Rourke, Marisa Tomei, Evan Rachel Wood, and Scott Franklin.

 

The Q & A was pretty good. The actors all said they did the movie because it was Aronofsky. Mickey said he read the script but only signed on because Aronofsky was directing. He said he probably would not have done it for another director and compared Aronofsky and his vision for the film to the way that Coppola approached Rumble Fish. He said the material was okay but Darren's abstract vision took it to another level and made it special.

 

Darren said that Rowdy Roddy Piper snuck into a recent screening and was very emotional about the film. He said it wasn't his story, but it was his story. Roddy pulled together a bunch of legendary wrestlers to attend tonight's Hollywood premiere.

 

Somehow the question of Evan's age came up and she admitted she was "born in 1987, the year Angel Heart came out." Mickey smiled and shook his head. A fan came up to Mickey with a photo circa '83 or '84 to get an autograph. Mickey looked at it and said, "Oh, you got a recent photograph."

 

I got to meet Darren for about 30 seconds, enough time to tell him that I worked with the Iron Sheik on an independent film on Sunday. Darren was happily surprised to hear that the Sheik was in town and wanted to invite him to the premiere. I did some legwork to put the film's producers in touch with Darren's assistant to try and make that happen because I know the Sheik would love it. But as of right now, I don't know if it happened or not.

 

 

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As you probably know, Bruce Springsteen wrote a beautiful original song for The Wrestler, which plays during the film’s ending credits. The song, self titled “The Wrestler”, is now available for download for 99 cents on Apple iTunes. Thanks to Tim at FilmTalk for the tip. I’ve included an excerpt from my Toronto interview with director Darren Aronofsky below, where he talks about how they got Bruce to do the song:

 

Peter Sciretta: Can you talk a little about the music of The Wrestler. You have Slash doing guitar riffs for Clint Mansell’s score, and you have Bruce Springsteen… How did you pull that one off?

 

Darren Aronofsky: Well, Bruce Springsteen did the film for one reason. And it had nothing do with me. In fact, to be honest, I met with Bruce, and he’s heard of me, which is very flattering, but he had never seen any of my work. He did it for one reason and that was that he did it for Mickey. He’s a friend of Mickey’s. He’s a tremendous fan of Mickey’s and when he heard about this film, he felt that this was something that Mickey’s been looking for for years. So he wanted to help, and that’s the only reason he did it. And he did it for basically nothing.

 

Peter Sciretta: That’s awesome.

 

Darren Aronofsky: Purely out of love for Mickey. And so I can’t wait for him to see the movie because Asbury Park is in it and I think he’ll be psyched.

 

Peter Sciretta: Oh, I’m surprised he hasn’t seen the movie. You listen to that song and it’s so dead on…

 

Darren Aronofsky: He actually put more effort into it. He read the screenplay which is probably harder than watching the movie. He read the screenplay, knew it and basically just pumped it out. It’s a beautiful song. As Mickey says, rock stars love him, and so he got Axl [Rose] to close a deal on Sweet Child of Mine. It was really fun rediscovering all that old Hair metal and finding a place for it in the film. And then Clint did a very subtle job in this movie, as compared to what we’ve done in the past. The film really didn’t call for a big score and what I really admire about what Clint did with the help of Slash is that they did very very very subtle work.

 

The Wrestler hits theaters in Los Angeles and New York today. Take a look at the full release date roll-out schedule to see when the film is coming to your city.

 

Source: http://www.slashfilm.com/2008/12/17/bruce-...tler-on-itunes/

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HOLLYWOOD -- After a slew of festivals and a Gotham bow, "The Wrestler" crew faced its final round of red-carpet preems Tuesday by taking on perhaps its toughest match -- an industry crowd at the Academy theater.

 

But helmer Darren Aronofsky and star Mickey Rourke held up like champs as they were surrounded by well-wishers at the low-key soiree.

 

Aronofsky described developing the script (with scribe Robert Siegel) with Rourke in mind. "It wasn't a lightbulb moment so much as it was just getting to know him. There's so much armor, but when you look into his eyes, you see he's as soft as a kitten."

 

Rourke, meanwhile, reflected on his career. "I've got many regrets and I know I'm not going to get another chance, but I've got a lot of time left to make up for the 13 to 14 years that I didn't work. All I want to do is be the best goddamn actor I can be."

 

Photo Gallery

 

Source: http://www.variety.com/article/VR111799757...yId=13&cs=1

 

 

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I just read a great interview about him in Time Magazine

 

He lost a lot all in the name of art, or so he thought. I can't wait to see this movie tomorrow night.

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Finally got an opportunity to see this film. Right from the beginning, you feel sadness. I wish I could explain it better, but when you see it, you will know what I mean. This man has hit rock bottom and he is trying to dig his way out. I learned a lot of things about the wrestling industry, that's for sure. When I watch WWE tonight I am definitely going to be looking more closely...:lol:

 

The way it is filmed, it seems more like a documentary. I really believe that the director left the camera rolling, and you can tell throughout the movie it looks like they are filming Mickey between breaks. Watching Mickey Rourke, playing a character, but being himself...amazing.

 

You feel his pain...I cried a few times throughout the film because it hit me that you are watching Mickey share his angst with you. The best scenes are between Mickey and Evan Rachel Wood, who plays his daughter. Those are gut wrenching. Mickey does a speech in front of her that when the film ended, I ran right out and called my father and told him I loved him. That's how deep this scene was.

 

Marisa Tomei DELIVERS. I definitely see Oscar nods for Mickey and her, that's for sure. WOW...I was waiting for "My Cousin Vinny" antics from her, and that did not happen. Thank goodness.

 

Overall, the film taught me how much wrestlers give to please the fans; even driving themselves after the applause is gone. But Mickey's character still shows the loyalty to the profession. I have a profound respect for the wrestling industry now. I was always entertained by them, but to see what they go through...my goodness. To watch this man rip himself apart, trying to put himself together again and make peace not only within but with his daughter...your heart breaks.

 

I have always been a fan of Mickey Rourke. This performance shows me it was not in vain. I predict an Oscar nomination; will he win? Maybe. It is rare they give Oscars to bad boys. But if they did, you would hear me cheering loudly, because he has earned it with this performance.

 

If you have ever tried to do the right thing, helped way too many people along the way, felt used, tormented, abused, thrown up against the wall and left for dead and felt completely alone in a room full of people, insecure, vulnerable, defeated, GO SEE THIS FILM because it gives you back hope, faith and reality. I looked around the theater and people were feeling this film. Some were crying, some were shaking their heads in agreement, it just hits all your emotions.

 

I give this film 4 RAW's and 2 snaps up. Also, check Mickey out on David Letterman tomorrow, 12/23/08. Check your listings.

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