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Give 'em Hell Malone

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looking for more cool pics to push on ya. Russel the DP and I just shot the last scene of the film in downtown LA ourselves, no crew, no trailer, no permits, nothing. just a camera a director and a guy in a bad suit. it was AWESOME. i want to shoot a whole film like that. people often comment about something looking 'unpolished' or cheap. i think we've all been spoiled and pussified by expensive studio fodder.

 

someday someone will make a dirty, gritty film for 2.50 and knock peoples socks off. intensity. realism. creative drive. these are what movies with balls are made of. it's good we're all being lulled to sleep by slick Hollywood fakery and B.S. posturing. me, i'm ready for a damn rude awakening.

 

Dude just go watch the first Pusher movie (and then the rest of the trilogy) directed by Nicolas Winding Refn. They are low budget, gritty and dirty looking Danish crime films with great performances. The first one was shot for $1 million dollars, they are just awesome films.

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It's going to be funny when the rest of us finally catch up to Mike on the Pusher films.

And by we I mean us the fans and Hollywood as well.

This kind of stuff has the tendency to languish for a couple of years before someone with some backing gets wise.

Then they make that film that blows people's minds while the inspiration for it continues to roil in obscurity.

In the best scenario of this, the info leaks about what inspired someone to do that kind of film and then maybe it becomes more widely known, even taking on cult status.

 

I have still yet to rent the Pusher tril.

On my list though Mike, on my list ;)

 

- TB

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Pusher is awesome, haven't gotten around to seeing the second and third yet. Only seen them in parts... their on my list!

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Pusher II is probably my favorite, III starts off pretty much as a dark comedy but by the third act it's faaaar from funny.

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The problem is the notion of the $2.50 film and this harks back to Coppola's ascertion to the transition of indie cinema is that while digital technology empowers to visually tell narrative 99 out of 100 times the story doesn't support the creative notion. All to often there are cases of people going out shooting stuff but not getting the material script and narrative just right.

 

There needs to be a supportive editorial process in script development. If the screenplay is right and working you can shoot the damn thing as Hitchcock did with Rope.

 

Not a lot of people know that Reservoir Dogs went through the Sundance lab. It was edited and adjusted to what it is now. That constructive feedback raised the bar.

 

The other big thing to comprehend is that film is product - a candy bar if you will to tailor to an audience. Actors and creative talent are paid what they are because their names mean something to a distributor who can onsell the product. Low budget gritty finds a very VERY hard time breaking through the market - near impossible these days for theatrical. There are other models of distribution but the success stories are few and far between.

 

I say this from a level of objectivity. I spent half a decade lecturing in the digital revolution for filmmaking and the hardest thing is not getting the project made but finding a distribution home so you can make this sustainable. That is why the forefront of my work has been focusing on getting the writing just right(or should that be write). There is a HUGE glut of mediocre product trying to find distribution - and I'm not just meaning studio, the amount of digital productions has increased ten fold and the majority cannot and will not find a revenue pathway.

 

That being said when something does breakthru and slaps you about the face with a wet fish then I'm all for it. Sadly though it will either come from a pure genius or more likely a non-repeatable fluke - like those pop songs from the eighties - the one hit wonders.

 

Grit isn't generated by low or no production values. Grit is generated by sincerity and a no holds barred approach. The empowerment of character is the answer there.

 

At the end of the day you also need to be sustainable to feed yourself and your family. Passion doesn't fill the belly or pay the bills. So the expectation of getting everyone to work for nothing has finite boundaries.

 

I'm only raising this because I think it's an insightful conversation that should be held. Each creative medium has it's own strengths and weaknesses. Comics and Graphic Novels have their own form as does Film and Television. The one medium which I think digital technology really empowers for self-sufficency is animation. There is no reason that someone couldn't spend a couple of years on their home computer and create a theatrical feature film masterpiece that would shock Pixar. For a quick example - motion capture setups now only cost $5,000 so you could record motion of your actors, model and animate. The key factor there is time. If you can afford more time you can create more. Without having to worry about the light dropping out before the final shot of the day.

 

regards

 

Andrew

 

 

 

 

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There are other models of distribution but the success stories are few and far between.

 

Do you mean financial success or artistic/critical success? This is something I've been fixated on for the last several months. I'm convinced there is a truly different distribution model out there that sidesteps the traditional market forces of which you speak but still supports the creative effort. (See Tiara's post about creative financing)

 

The way you've framed it, all artists involved in a film are slave/whored to the 'distributors'. What if we just cut them out and become our own distributors? Not all artists sell their work through a gallery. There's got to be a way, through the internet or some other digital format, that we could create our own screening events. Interested parties on the ground come up with their own cash & marketing to host a screening event - a digitally direct micro cinema. Or even a Rhapsody, I-Tunes subscription/pay for ownership model for indie films?

 

Ooops, let me cover my naivete for a moment. My Dad was Warren Miller's point guy in upstate NY in the early 60's. Warren would call him a few weeks ahead of time, tell him when and my Dad would get back to him on the where. On the night of, my Dad would have his group together, have the projector ready and Warren would swoop in, screen it, take some cash from the door and move on to the next ski-crazed town. (For the young 'uns, skiing was a truly oddball/cultist thing in the late 50's early 60's and films about them...well, Warren was the only one.) Look at what happened to the Warren Miller franchise now, yeah it's totally sold-out but it's "successful".

 

So, if y'all said, Karyn, we're coming to Tahoe and want to show Malone there. I'd scramble like hell to get you the best venue and best audience - all communed with hemmed panties and their own cutlery. ;)

 

 

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The big thing I'm talking about is sustainability. Finding the correct threshold that empowers you to be self sufficent in creating your content. While you can argue that a true artist does it for the passion the reality is that everyone needs to eat, and feed and cloth themselves.

 

The indie approach to distribution has as you've commented been done for decades. People travelling from town to town with their film reels - booking out University halls etc.

 

Distribution is an essential arm to getting your story out there. It is also important in the way that finances your project. If you can be completely self sufficent in your production costs then that is fine. In fact I was playing around yesterday with some greenscreen footage I shot a couple of years back and I think it is totally feasible to do a no budget style Sin City or 300 on a home computer - that is where the digital technology can empower the creative - because where the extra resources come into play is time - personal time. If you're on a set with crew around then you are at the mercy of elements, but a controlled green screen studio allows for simplicity.

 

So there are two parts to the conversation - getting the film completed with no budget- which can be done, but without some input to distribution it may be difficult finding a commercial home.

 

Internet distribution is feasible and sustainable. There are a variety of models around that make sense but the counter arguement is that if people can get their content for free on YouTube then they need a very strong motivation to pay for content. The flip side of that is that on-line pornography has proven the distribution model works.

 

So is there a clear cut answer? I don't know. What I do know is that over the past ten years I have researched various models and if they have the right product then they can be feasible but the other honest reality is that the majority of content out there doesn't push the boundaries.

 

regards

 

Andrew

 

 

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So is there a clear cut answer? I don't know. What I do know is that over the past ten years I have researched various models and if they have the right product then they can be feasible but the other honest reality is that the majority of content out there doesn't push the boundaries.

 

regards

 

Andrew

Got it - always looking for ways out of the box and inevitably you get thrust right back in it.

 

I'm also frustrated because for once in my life I don't live in a major market (my closest major markets are Sacramento, 2 hours away or San Fran, 4 hours away). Appaloosa was in my town for 7 days and I missed that one 'cause I blinked looking for a babysitter. I know Black Dynamite will never see the light of day here and I'm afraid Malone, Dark Country, Bullet Waits For You, etc. will never reach here either. Yet, I've got this gargantuan-new-multi-million-dollar-blaring-box-casino-cineplex-trash that pushed-out-the-little-guy that will feed drek and pablum to anyone. Grrrr.....

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Got it - always looking for ways out of the box and inevitably you get thrust right back in it.

 

I'm also frustrated because for once in my life I don't live in a major market (my closest major markets are Sacramento, 2 hours away or San Fran, 4 hours away). Appaloosa was in my town for 7 days and I missed that one 'cause I blinked looking for a babysitter. I know Black Dynamite will never see the light of day here and I'm afraid Malone, Dark Country, Bullet Waits For You, etc. will never reach here either. Yet, I've got this gargantuan-new-multi-million-dollar-blaring-box-casino-cineplex-trash that pushed-out-the-little-guy that will feed drek and pablum to anyone. Grrrr.....

 

It is true that the advent of the internet does reduce the location residency issue for viewing content as long as it makes itself available. One of the biggest problems used to be the delivery windows between countries. For example in New Zealand we would often have to wait for up to six months after US release before a film was released here. Even now I can use 3:10 to Yuma as an example. It wasn't theatrically released here till March of this year, so instead I purchased the DVD off Amazon early January.

 

Used creatively digital technology offers limitless possibilities in creating lush visual narrative. To prove (or disprove) this theory I've been playing around with some green screen footage I shot two years ago for the mobile phone version of A Bullet Waits For You. I rendered this current sequence using still images from a $5 photo cd as background plates. While it is not perfect it would allow with investment of additional time a mechanism to tell a strong story with limited resources.

 

Digital Composite

 

The notion does open up possibilities.

 

warmest regards

 

Andrew

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You can't put alcohol in a Harrison quote from Raiders buddy! ;)

 

 

P.S.

 

I'm behind on these threads what/who is Thorogood?

Sorry, been busy renovating my basement

 

-Raffi

 

And if you get into Thorogood (as everyone in their right mind should), you should definitely check out John Lee Hooker. A lot of the same tracks (like One Bourbon, One Scotch, and One Beer--killer stuff), but old-school blues, fuckin classic.

 

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sounds a little premature to pick the date, since we don't have distrib yet. Russell is watching the assembly like now. which means we'll have a cut sometime in January.

nice pics of Elsa Pataky, huh? she's a sweetheart. TJ

 

 

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...Russel the DP and I just shot the last scene of the film in downtown LA ourselves, no crew, no trailer, no permits, nothing. just a camera a director and a guy in a bad suit. it was AWESOME...

I love this, guerrilla filmmaking, and a guy in a bad suit ... yeah, baby!

 

sounds a little premature to pick the date, since we don't have distrib yet. Russell is watching the assembly like now. which means we'll have a cut sometime in January.

nice pics of Elsa Pataky, huh? she's a sweetheart. TJ

Elsa is very pretty ... in that one pic, she reminds me of a brunette Traci Lords - but I don't think she really actually looks like Traci, does she? I'll have to check other photos ...

 

Or maybe, the movie! ;)

 

Looking forward to it!

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Hi Tom.I don't know if anybody ask you this yet,but have you saw the rough cut of Give Em'Hell Malone yet?If so what you think about it so far?And if the movie is a success, would you like to make a sequel?BTW,I saw the teaser and it looks great:) It has a throwback 70's action,crime,film noir ,feel to it.Which is very sweet:)

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Happy new year Tom. Did you like the shooting of "Give Em'Hell Malone".

And how was the work with Russell Mulcahy?

 

 

mcediu

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First off I’m new to these boards… only found out about them when looking up stuff about this movie.

 

My real intro to Jane’s acting was when he portrayed one of my top two favorite Marvel comic characters with the Punisher. I really enjoyed that movie… of all three versions it was the one that came the closest to the character I took away from the comics, and I was really looking forward to that next step. After the… I guess I’ll use the word ‘disappointment’ that the new film was for me I started looking at forum/message boards to see what other people thought.

 

Only a couple weeks ago did I once more take another look at Jane’s profile on IMDb and trust me the movie title Give ‘em Hell, Malone definitely caught my eye.

 

With a title like that you think I wasn’t going to find out what I could about the movie?!

 

After watching the trailer I actually said… out loud even…

“Good god, I need to see this!”

 

It’s been quite a while since I’m been this interested in a movie that wasn’t some form of adaptation (novel or comic).

 

And now after reading through all the posts here and seeing the extra pictures Tim Bradstreet put up I’m even more psyched about it.

 

I love how Jane looks… the coat, the hat, the gun

 

I almost can’t wait until this is finished up and released.

 

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Here's a link to an interview with Chris Yen who is in the film:

 

"KFC: It looks like some great actors are involved in MALONE, and they seem to be having fun with their roles.

 

CY: I was very lucky to be working with this cast - people like Thomas Jane, Ving Rhames...experienced actors that I really got to learn from. Thomas was very supportive of me."

 

More at:

http://www.kungfucinema.com/?p=5154

 

 

Jen

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And he said, “We’re going to do as many shots as it takes until they get what they need. So don’t worry, I’m fine.”

 

I love that :wub: - so cool, supportive, matter of fact, and just "do what you need to do" and we'll get it done. B)

 

We know that Thomas is passionate about his work, but I just cannot imagine him actually yelling at anyone on set ... maybe some strong words, or emphatic language, but not full-blown shouting like some other folks. Ahem.

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Here's a link to an interview with Chris Yen who is in the film:

 

"KFC: It looks like some great actors are involved in MALONE, and they seem to be having fun with their roles.

 

CY: I was very lucky to be working with this cast - people like Thomas Jane, Ving Rhames...experienced actors that I really got to learn from. Thomas was very supportive of me."

 

More at:

http://www.kungfucinema.com/?p=5154

 

 

Jen

 

It was a very interesting interview. But, for some reason, I was really hungry for chicken after seeing KFC over and over and over again.

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It was a very interesting interview. But, for some reason, I was really hungry for chicken after seeing KFC over and over and over agaain.

 

 

:lol: k-skye! I was thinking the same thing while reading the interview. I was going to type out "Kung Fu Cinema", so it looks more understandable when just reading that excerpt, but then didn't do it...

 

 

Jen

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I'm really looking forward to seeing this film!

 

The teaser trailer looks awesome and Thomas very cool as usual.

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I'm not sure if this will hold, but at IMDB.com, they're listing the release date as April 1, 2009! This sounds too soon in a way, although I hope it's true, because April's right around the corner. :D

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1258137/

 

 

Also, there's an interview online with another of the cast members, actor Gregory Harrison and he has this to say about the film:

 

"And then I just shot another feature called Give ‘em Hell, Malone with Ving Rhames and Thomas Jane. And the release date is yet to be announced on that."

 

http://nicegirlstv.com/2009/03/15/intervie...egory-harrison/

 

 

 

Jen

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