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Jason

Hey Tim or anyone else, I need some help here.

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Well the program I have on my computer is photo impact pro, which is like photoshop, but less convienient.

 

See last year I asked my teacher about how exactly can I color my picture without messing up any or losing any deatil of my inked or penciled pictures.

He showed me how to make a a layer under my image layer and then that layer I was alowed to color and it would show up on my image layer, just not on the black areas.

 

I dunno how confusing that sounds, but I totally forgot what he did, and I would really like to know how again because my newer art is losing detail.

 

So Tim or anyone here knows how to do this, please guide me through how exactly how to.

 

My program I use is kinda different from photoshop, but it has similar things so i'd be able to wing it.

 

Thanks,

Jason

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I am not an artist by any means but maybe I can help a little. Forgive me if I tell you something you already know!

 

First, you'll want to duplicate the main image on to a second layer. On the old layer (the background) just select everything and delete it (keep the layer though - you'll need a blank white layer anyway!) Back to the newer layer - you'll want to change the contrast somewhat to make the lines dark enough so that the program can tell them apart from the white areas (assuming they aren't already.) You could maybe play with brightness and contrast, but I'd recommend using whatever "levels" feature your program has... I think photoshop has an "edit levels" function in one of the menus.

 

If you do use a level editing feature, you'll be playing with two main features - one is a color selector that will take a shade and make that shade and everything darker completely black (it may be a black eye dropper as it is in photoshop.) The other levels tool is similiar, but will take whatever shade you click on and make it (and any lighter shades) completely white (a white eye dropper perhaps.)

 

You'll basically want to strike a balance to the point where you can use a color selection tool (NOT contigous [sp] - that way you select all of the white spots) to select everything that's white and delete it so that only the black spots on your newer layer still exist.

 

The goal is to be left with a completely white layer in the background that you can put some colors on, and an upper layer that only has lines on it. The way I've described it is very simplified and may take some playing with to figure out but I think it should be enough to point you the right way.

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I am not an artist by any means but maybe I can help a little. Forgive me if I tell you something you already know!

 

First, you'll want to duplicate the main image on to a second layer. On the old layer (the background) just select everything and delete it (keep the layer though - you'll need a blank white layer anyway!) Back to the newer layer - you'll want to change the contrast somewhat to make the lines dark enough so that the program can tell them apart from the white areas (assuming they aren't already.) You could maybe play with brightness and contrast, but I'd recommend using whatever "levels" feature your program has... I think photoshop has an "edit levels" function in one of the menus.

 

If you do use a level editing feature, you'll be playing with two main features - one is a color selector that will take a shade and make that shade and everything darker completely black (it may be a black eye dropper as it is in photoshop.) The other levels tool is similiar, but will take whatever shade you click on and make it (and any lighter shades) completely white (a white eye dropper perhaps.)

 

You'll basically want to strike a balance to the point where you can use a color selection tool (NOT contigous [sp] - that way you select all of the white spots) to select everything that's white and delete it so that only the black spots on your newer layer still exist.

 

The goal is to be left with a completely white layer in the background that you can put some colors on, and an upper layer that only has lines on it. The way I've described it is very simplified and may take some playing with to figure out but I think it should be enough to point you the right way.

 

 

Thanks Kevin, I'll try it out as soon as I have time to!

I need to otherwise my stuff is gonna keep on sucking.

 

thnaks for the info again!

 

-Jason

 

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