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Tim Bradstreet

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I'm just as much a fan of Jerry Goldsmith's score for the European version of Legend as I am the classic Tangerine Dream score.

Fortunately Goldsmith fans were finally blessed with a release of that score a few years back.

Tangerine Dream was hot and Synth scores were "in" when Legend was in post. The studio decided it might play better to American audiences with a score by the band that did Risky Business. Both versions of the film are now available on a special edition DVD.

 

Legend DVD (Ultimate Edition)

 

From Brett D. Cullum

 

LEGEND never really found an audience in theatres despite Ridley Scott and Universal's constant tinkering with the final cut. Seems many movies of this era were victims of audience test screenings, and the desire to give people a commercial product that went down easy -- see BRAZIL for a prime example of how studios think (the "love conquers all" version). So LEGEND was severely edited and rescored with a hasty (but often effective score by TANGERINE DREAM). It was short on plot and long on art direction, but sumptuous visuals and an all-out acting job by Tim Curry and make-up artist Rick Bottin made the movie an easy favorite of many fantasy fans. The movie looks stunning, and the story is a universal plunge into archetypes. Nothing wrong with that, it certainly worked for STAR WARS!

This DVD collection gives you two versions of LEGEND -- the original director's cut with over twenty minutes of added footage and the original Goldsmith score; and in addition, you get the original US release. In essence you get two different movies! The moods vary, the characters seem a little different, with whole new speeches and images to enjoy. If you are a fan of the movie or Ridley Scott it's a MUST-HAVE! This is what DVD dreams are made of. While many bemoan the fact BLADE RUNNER does not come with its 2 versions -- the fact is other than the narration and the happy ending, there is not MUCH different. But here we have a case where you can see what happens to a movie as it goes through development HELL. Fascinating stuff, and it comes LOADED with extras.

 

The only downside is the director's cut gets the royal treatment of a 5.1 sound mix while the other version gets a 2 channel Dolby mix, and even the video quality seems different with again the director's cut looking better than the theatrical release. But at last we can see a widescreen version of either cut, and we get a lot of extras that explain some of why the movie is the way it ended up. Beautiful images, two good soundtracks (I like both though the mood changes), and basically strong performances. LEGEND is a waking dream!

 

As for the Last Of The Mohicans score, I love the original by Trevor Jones and Randy Edelman. My original CD is battered to death from use. I am not however much of a fan of the Re-Issue that was released in 2000 conducted by Joel McNeely and performed by The Scottish National Orchestra.

It does feature a bit of material not released on the original score but McNeely's orchestration never hits the heart like the original recording.

 

 

- TB

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I like that review from Brett D. Cullum. I should really get the Legend DVD.

 

Hehehehe!:D Your original Last Mohicans CD is battered to death from use.

 

Star Trek: III is my favorite Star Trek film and I love the score to it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_SGXx3pLzs

 

 

Shadow of the Colossus is a video game I have for the PS2 and I think is has one of the best scores I have ever heard on a video game.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNIJhzFLeMk

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Tim- did you get the Bushi Tales soundtrack I sent?

 

It's probably a bit more techno than you might like, but the first time I heard the main theme I got goosebumps! Especially when I heard the sword clashes. Joel nailed the feeling we wanted with it, and I like the different influences on the rest. It's always fun to put on while I'm coloring pages.

 

Hope you dig it.

 

Lin

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Tim- good call!

Legend is one of my top 5 favorite movies of all time, actually. It is absolutely beautiful, and I have to agree that the director's cut is a must-see. The extended scene with Meg, and the creepy fire scene with Gump are fantastic. The uncut version adds to the dark fairytale feel, as does the European soundtrack (though I have to admit I do love Tangerine Dream, and I own the US soundtrack and score).

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Here is a special treat for real film score fans. Take the time to read this through, it's completely fascinating.

 

The following is an excerpt from the liner notes taken directly from the CD booklet that accompanies the SILVA SCREEN release of the Jerry Goldsmith score. This text was written by Paul Andrew MacLean © 1992.

 

THE MUSIC

 

As much as the visual essence of faerie tales is captured in Ridley Scott's images, Jerry Goldsmith deftly conjures their musical ambience in his score. Goldsmith is clearly imbued with an uncanny insight into the characteristic playfulness and ethereal sensuality of faeries and woodland spirits, as well as the dark brooding and hate of demonic forces, and his score rings quintessentially true.

 

Goldsmith had previously worked with Ridley Scott on ALIEN, but found it a frustrating experience, sighting lack of creative input and feedback from the director as a major difficulty. As a result, Goldsmith's score for ALIEN was not used as it was intended, and some of his original music was discarded in favor of temp music (consisting of Howard Hanson's "Symphony #2") and Goldsmith's own music for the 1962 film FREUD". In spite of his experience on ALIEN, however, Goldsmith was the never the less very eager to score LEGEND, having been utterly bewitched by the beauty of William Hjortsberg script.

 

Written in London over 3 months, Goldsmith scored LEGEND for a full orchestra and chorus, embellished by an ensemble of synthesizers, including the YAMAHA DX-7, ROLAND JP-8, MEMORYMOOG, OBERHEIM OB,-8 DMX & DSX, and Sequential PROPHET-T8. Unlike the coarse, propulsive synthesizer music of RUNAWAY (a futuristic action adventure thriller Goldsmith completed shortly before LEGEND), the electronics here complement the orchestra and chorus with a sparkling, effervescent air, evoking faerie enchantment and black magic, while at the same time fulfilling more specific character expression, in particular for the goblins and Oona.

 

Stylistically, the score is lushly Romantic, yet suffused with the fluidity of Impressionism as well. The way Goldsmith veers from familiar tonality into the mysterious and uncertain atonal realm, makes the score inherently evocative of fantasy. As the music drifts between tonality and atonality, so does fantasy drift within that twilight realm between dreams and reality, the concrete physical world and the spirit realm. The use of voices also lends a spiritual atmosphere, with a vocalise chorus suggestive of angels (and sometimes demons), swirling about the orchestra in a fashion somewhat reminiscent of another great fantasy score, Maurice Ravel's ballet DAPHNIS ET CHLOE. Elements of folk music are also prominent in Goldsmith's score, most notably in the faerie music, such as the song "Sing the Wee", and Gump's reel-like solo fiddle in "Faerie Dance".

 

Goldsmith's contribution to LEGEND was also more than an ordinary film score. While most of the music was written for the completed film in post-production, Goldsmith actually began working in pre-production, with choreographer Arlene Phillips on the film's dance sequences, and with lyricists John Bettis on the songs sung by Lili and the faeries (Goldsmith had previously worked with Bettis on THE LONELY GUY and TWILIGHT ZONE-THE MOVIE). However, while dances and songs were featured in the film, LEGEND is not a musical, where dramatic "reality" is suspending to accommodate musical numbers. Rather, these songs and dances occur within the context of their respective scenes as part of the story (for example, Lili singing in order to attract the Unicorn, or the faeries casting a spell on Jack to dance him to death).

 

The score is thematically complex, although Goldsmith refrains from using leitmotifs, per se, believing that a score should instead be built from one basic theme, and out of that theme a few notes extracted and re-configured to develop more themes, so that all the material is related and indigenous to that one score.

 

When LEGEND was reduced to its 95 minute release cut, this of course necessitated that the music track be cut-down as well. Unfortunately this was executed with little regard for the cohesion of the score. Cues were indiscriminately edited, if not needlessly removed altogether. Worse, bits of different cues were cut together to make "new" pieces of music (Resulting in awkward shifts in key, tempo and orchestration), while other cues were used more than once, resulting in redundancy. Additionally, as in ALIEN, temp music was again retained (this time from Goldsmith's score for PSYCHO II plus library music by British composer Tim Souster), resulting in a breach of stylistic structure.

 

But even in its ravaged state, Goldsmith's score still contributed greatly to LEGEND, bringing to life its faerie-tale heart and soul. Fortunately, preserved on disc, the music's evocation of nature, spirituality, heroism, love and the epic struggle of powers of light and darkness can be heard in its fullness, as it was originally meant to be.

 

THE COMPOSER

 

Jerry Goldsmith was born in Los Angeles in 1929. He studied piano with Jacob Gimpel, and composition with Mario Castelnuovo - Tedesco. Goldsmith's strong love of drama, coupled with the prospect of how difficult it might be to make a living writing concert music, convinced him to pursue a career composing music for films. Goldsmith continued his education at UCLA, while studying film scoring with Miklos Rozsa at USC. Expertise with another kind of keyboard, the typewriter, enabled Goldsmith to land a position as a clerk/typist at CBS radio in Hollywood, where, as he put it, "a lot of persistence and nagging" finally gave him the opportunity to write music for radio drama programmes. Goldsmith ultimately broke into television, where he contributed noteworthy scores for many productions, including DR. KILDARE, PERRY MASON, PLAYHOUSE 90, GUNSMOKE and THE TWILIGHT ZONE.

 

In time, Goldsmith graduated to feature films, and during the sixties his talents were sought-out by legendary film directors such as John Huston, Sam Peckinpah, Otto Preminger and Robert Wise. Since then, Goldsmith has earned a reputation as perhaps the most continually eclectic and prolific composer for films, with diverse scores for over 150 productions, among them A PATCH OF BLUE, PLANET OF THE APES, PATTON, CHINATOWN, MAGIC, STAR TREK - THE MOTION PICTURE, POLTERGEIST, UNDER FIRE, TOTAL RECALL, THE RUSSIA HOUSE and BASIC INSTINCT.

 

Goldsmith has also established a reputation in the concert hall as well as films. He made his public conducting debut in 1969 with the Southern California Chamber Symphony, performing his cantata "Christus Apollo". His orchestral concert works have been premiered by ensembles such as the St. Louis Symphony conducted by Leonard Slatkin, and the Dallas Symphony conducted by Goldsmith himself, while his ballets have been performed by the National Ballet of Australia, the San Francisco Ballet, and Ballemet, a young dance company in Columbus, Ohio. Over the last several years Goldsmith has also conducted a successful series of live concerts of his film music with many of the top orchestras in Great Britain, the United States and Canada.

 

Jerry Goldsmith is one of the most trend setting and respected of composers, and his influence on an entire generation of younger film composers is most apparent. Conductor Leonard Slatkin has noted Goldsmith as an example of how film music is sometimes more adventurous and forward-looking than much of the music that has been written for the concert hall in recent years. Goldsmith is also a strong advocate of electronic instruments being accepted as a new section of the orchestra, and that their inclusion is part of the orchestra's necessary and inevitable evolution.

 

As an artist, Jerry Goldsmith is not a great believer in waiting for "inspiration", nor does he subscribe to the notion of creative burn-out. For him, creativity stems from being disciplined enough to just sit down and write, and as long as one has mastered one's craft, music will come.

 

Goldsmith has been the recipient of many honors, including six Golden Globe nominations, seven Grammy nominations, and fourteen Academy Award nominations, winning the Oscar for THE OMEN.

 

THE AMERICAN RELEASE

 

Although Jerry Goldsmith's score was noted in many reviews of the European release as one of the film's most positive attributes, Universal Executive Sidney Jay Sheinberg determined that the success in America was dependent on replacing Goldsmith's score with more commercial, pop/rock-style music. This would theoretically make the film more "accessible" to, and attract, teenage audiences, as well as allow for a more marketable pop-music soundtrack album. The fact that LEGEND had been conceived in pre-production with Goldsmith's dance sequences and songs as an inherent element (the script actually contained John Bettis' lyrics) was apparently considered irreverent.

 

The Universal version was also cut differently, with a few shots and quick scenes which were not in the Fox release, including an ill-fitting kissing scene early in the film (derived from different shots of Jack and Lili's kiss at the film's end), which utterly ruins the faerie-tale innocence of Jack and Lili by implying they have had sex.

 

Scott was bitter about the changes imposed by the American distributor, which were against the essential nature of the film, and a clear attempt to capture the core audience of MTV and John Hughes' teen-narcissism films, which were big money-makers at the time. But Scott, now wallowing in the all-to-common post-production doldrums where director's are convinced their latest creation is a flop, bowed willingly to Sheinberg (who personally presided over the editing), welcoming the "objective" collaboration of someone who also desired the film's success. However, when LEGEND was released in America, it received scalding reviews and failed to be the hit with teens that Sheinberg had hoped after all his "improvements".

 

Interestingly, around the same time, Sheinberg also attempted to "improve" the other Arnon Milchan production awaiting release by Universal - Terry Gilliam's BRAZIL, by dumping Michael Kamen's score (again in favor of pop music), as well as other radical narrative alterations. Gilliam however remained steadfast that BRAZIL be released his way, and threatened to burn the negative if his wishes were not honored. The director's cut of BRAZIL wound-up winning the award for Best Picture of 1985 from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association, and Sheinberg was left with abundant egg on his face (and within a year, Sheinberg was to have an even worse disaster, having personally "green-lighted" the infamous HOWARD THE DUCK).

 

Had LEGEND been released as originally intended, who can say what its reception might have been? But shorn of one quarter of its running time, and one of its most powerful elements - Jerry Goldsmith's score, its failure was unsurprising, and in that state, perhaps deserved.

 

THE TANGERINE DREAM SCORE

 

Selected to replace Goldsmith's score was Tangerine Dream, the German electronic group, consisting of synthesists Chris Franke, Johannes Schmoelling and Edgar Froese (who originally formed the ensemble).

 

It is probable that the Dream's work on RISKY BUSINESS was a deciding factor in their selection, as it was at that time Tom Cruise's most successful film, and Universal no doubt thought the Dream's involvement in another Tom Cruise film would invest LEGEND with the "successful formula" to attract the youth market.

 

The Dream approached LEGEND differently from Goldsmith, scoring the film "wall-to-wall" (with roughly 85 minutes of music for the ninety-minute cut), largely retaining their signature style of Eastern-influenced "New Age" pop throughout.

 

While the Dream have not been unsuccessful in some of their film endeavors, their adherence to purely electronic music, and their admitted desire to retain a consistent stylistic "identity" even when doing films, limits the spectrum of assignments to which they can effectively contribute. Although the "metaphysical" electronic sound of the dream would seem on the surface correct for LEGEND's air of spirituality, its appropriateness is questionable, as the Dream's style is strongly rooted in Eastern traditions, while LEGEND's was rooted in Western lore of Britain and northern Europe.

 

There are moments of effectiveness in their LEGEND score, but much of their music feels stylistically out-of-place, such as the sampled sitar playing a quasi-pentatonic melody, while the more gritty, rock-styled cues clash with the delicate, faerie-tale quality of the film, as well as affecting the credibility of Tom Cruise's performance (the slick, RISKY BUSINESS-style of certain cues clashing with Cruise's playing a kinder, gentler, kind of teenager).

 

One thing Tangerine Dream's score did have in common with Goldsmith's however, was that it also fell victim to studio meddling. When Universal decided a song was needed over the final scene of the film, they simply overlaid the Dream's cue for the finale with the vocals of Jon Anderson (without the Dream's cooperation). The Dream were obviously not pleased by this interference, but had no say when it was done, nor when a totally ill-fitting rock song by Bryan Ferry was put over the end credits (Universal no doubt felt that Bryan *Ferry* was the right choice for a *faerie* tale).

 

While Goldsmith's score complemented LEGEND perfectly, it would appear that Ridley Scott is somewhat indecisive when it comes to music, as was previously illustrated by Scott's hiring electronic composer Vangelis to score BLADE RUNNER, even though much of that film was in fact temp-tracked with *orchestra* music from Goldsmith's PLANET OF THE APES and James Horner's HUMANOIDS FROM THE DEEP.

 

Ironically, when Universal sold LEGEND to American television, they beefed-up its running time by adding footage from the Goldsmith-scored version, so that in one scene Goldsmith's score suddenly pops in for a few minutes, then the Dream's music returns, causing a jarring clash of styles.

 

In the final analysis, few involved with LEGEND came away particularly pleased, but the fate of the film served to reinforce the notion that entertainment businessmen should best remain in their swivel chairs and leave creative work to creative people.

 

 

You can purchase the Tangerine Dream score at Screen Archives (only 1 available). It's out of print and expensive. This copy is near mint and unsealed. $74.95

 

The Goldsmith score is available at Screen Archives as well.

The Silva Screen Edition (the best) - Only 1 available, near mint, unsealed. $24.95

 

Legend - SLA Edition (first US release). Same tracks as the Silva Screen Edition. $14.95

 

Shop around at Screen Archives, they have some incredible stuff available, including lots of rare goodies and special editions.

 

- TB

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My most recent purchase and one I want to crow about endlessly is Miklos Rozsa's incredible score for EL CID.

 

10068.jpg

 

Excerpt from Soundtrack Collector.com -

"Tadlow Music has done a great job by releasing probably the most ambitious and expensive film music re-recording, Miklos Rozsa's complete score for El Cid. The music is performed by the 90-piece City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus, conducted by Nic Raine. This spectacular new digital recording features the complete 140 minute score plus a number of bonus tracks, a total of nearly three hours of music..! Also included in this 3 CD-set are five videos from the El Cid recording sessions in Prague. And, as an extra, a new recording of a suite from another famous Miklos Rozsa score, Double Indemnity. The set comes with an 28 page full colour booklet with introductions from Martin Scorsese and Juliet Rozsa."

 

You can sample tracks here at Screen Archives

 

I've been a fan of Rozsa's since I was first swept away by his score for Ben-Hur many years ago.

About 10 years ago I picked up a wonderful CD of El Cid conducted by James Sedares and performed by the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra. It's been a mainstay in my collection ever since, and it's probably become my favorite Rozsa score. But it always seemed incomplete even though there is 65 minutes of music I knew it was missing a lot.

I also have a complete score including small incidental cues and out-takes, for Rozsa's Ben-Hur, an edition put out by Rhino Records - 88 tracks and over 2 hours and 27 minutes of Rozsa's masterwork. I'd always hoped someone would do a similar treatment for El Cid. Now my long wait is over ;) . . .

 

. . . And I have not been disappointed. This new edition is AMAZING.

 

You can pick it up here - EL CID (COMPLETE SCORE RERECORDING - 3 CDS) (CD) - And they take paypal too!

 

 

- TB

 

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Incidentally, one score that has eluded me forever is Tangerine Dream's score to The Keep.

I own a bootleg of the music but the sound quality is pop, crack, and hiss.

Keep_ORCD20011983.gif

Not at all too wonderful.

 

I'm looking to get my hands on either of the two official releases by the band.

The music has never been released officially by the studio as an official soundtrack.

 

I'm trying to get either of these -

 

This one -

 

Keep_TDI010CD.jpg

 

Released in 1997 - This is the VERY rare first official release of the complete original score on Tangerine Dream's own TDI label. Limited Edition of only 150 copies, packaged in a specially designed cardboard box and sold during TD's 1997 concert tour of Great Britain.

 

Or this one -

 

Keep_TDI_NoLabel.jpg

 

Released in 1999 - This is the second and last (?) official release of this score by Tangerine Dream's own TDI MUSIC label. This CD was limited to 300 copies and features different cover artwork than the first release.

 

Anyone have a line on these? I'm open to do some trading.

 

Thanks - TB

 

 

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Incidentally, one score that has eluded me forever is Tangerine Dream's score to The Keep.

I own a bootleg of the music but the sound quality is pop, crack, and hiss.

Keep_ORCD20011983.gif

Not at all too wonderful.

 

I'm not really sure, but this may be of a better sound quality. If you decide to download it, you're gonna need WinRAR to open it.

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I've been a fan of Rozsa's since I was first swept away by his score for Ben-Hur many years ago.

About 10 years ago I picked up a wonderful CD of El Cid conducted by James Sedares and performed by the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra. It's been a mainstay in my collection ever since, and it's probably become my favorite Rozsa score. But it always seemed incomplete even though there is 65 minutes of music I knew it was missing a lot.

I also have a complete score including small incidental cues and out-takes, for Rozsa's Ben-Hur, an edition put out by Rhino Records - 88 tracks and over 2 hours and 27 minutes of Rozsa's masterwork. I'd always hoped someone would do a similar treatment for El Cid. Now my long wait is over ;) . . .

- TB

 

I didn't realize the NZSO performed a rendition of the score. Will have to check it out as well as the new release.

 

Andrew

 

 

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I don't have that version, thanks Mike!

 

Andrew - If El Cid is any indication of the talent of the NZSO then I am impressed.

Wouldn't it be great if we could employ them along with Andrea for the film?

Or would Andrea want to record it all in Italy?

 

- TB

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I don't have that version, thanks Mike!

 

Andrew - If El Cid is any indication of the talent of the NZSO then I am impressed.

Wouldn't it be great if we could employ them along with Andrea for the film?

Or would Andrea want to record it all in Italy?

 

- TB

 

Tim,

 

Exactly

 

you got me thinking about the NZSO with your post this morning. I'll mention it to Andrea. We have set aside a large budget (more than normal for the score). Until now the premise has been recording in Rome, if the budget was less he has an orchestra in Bulgeria that he uses. The NZSO could be something to consider - however I have made the promise of going to Rome for the record - just for posterity sake. Plus that'll be most likely where we'll have the direct interaction with Ennio.

 

And for those trying to decipher what Tim and I are talking about it might be time to spill this public albeit it in a cryptic fashion.

 

We are talking about Ennio & Andrea Morricone.

 

More news on all of this shortly.

 

regards

 

Andrew

 

 

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I'm literally bursting to talk about it but I leave the official unveiling to Andrew.

Yes, folks will find out soon enough but there is still a ways to go before we can let this cat out of the bag.

There will be a thread on the topic soon enough ;)

 

- TB

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Yo Mike - Thanks for the hook-up.

That appears to be the official TD release from 1999.

Normally I stand against downloading music freebies available on the net.

But when it's a question of a long out of print situation I do what I have to do to hear the music.

When and if it becomes available again I plan to purchase it.

I'm a sucker for cool packaging too ;)

 

Something of interest that I've noticed (As I've stumbled across some of these tracks before) is that there seem to be two versions of The Keep.

Here's what I'm talking about.

 

The track listing for another version of the score I came across (The Keep - An Alternate View - Tangerine Tree Volume 54) jibes directly with the film and I am intimately familiar with the following cues -

 

1. Stormbringer

2. Dinu Pass

3. Release

4. Awakening

5. Black Soldiers

6. Reunion

7. Gloria

8. Incarnation

9. Betrayal

10. Glaeken's Death

11. Talisman

12. The Final Conflict

13. The Evil Within

14. Fisherman's Morning

15. Walking In The Air

 

The Official releases have a track listing like this -

 

1. Gloria´s Theme

2. Ancient Powerplant

3. The Silver Seal

4. Voices from a common land

5. Arx Allemand

6. The Night in Romania

7. Canzone

8. Sign in the dark

9. Weird Village

10. Love and Destiny

11. The Challenger´s Arrival

12. Supernatural Accomplice

13. Parallel Worlds

14. Truth and Fiction

15. Wardays Sunrise

16. Heritage Survival

 

And the bootleg I own has all 16 of the official release tracks PLUS the edition of these 4 -

 

17. South Camora

18. Moorland

19. Silver Scale

20. The Keep (Logos)

 

I don't recognize all the tracks (From TD's Official release + the bootleg) from the film. So I must assume that a lot of this was trimmed from the film version.

It seems that none of the versions out there are complete on their own, but together they likely form a fairly complete score.

Fucking interesting. I'd love to know the story behind this.

 

Anyway, I seem to have all the music now ;)

Cheers.

 

- TB

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Yo Mike - Thanks for the hook-up.

That appears to be the official TD release from 1999.

Normally I stand against downloading music freebies available on the net.

But when it's a question of a long out of print situation I do what I have to do to hear the music.

When and if it becomes available again I plan to purchase it.

I'm a sucker for cool packaging too ;)

 

Something of interest that I've noticed (As I've stumbled across some of these tracks before) is that there seem to be two versions of The Keep.

Here's what I'm talking about.

 

The track listing for another version of the score I came across (The Keep - An Alternate View - Tangerine Tree Volume 54) jibes directly with the film and I am intimately familiar with the following cues -

 

1. Stormbringer

2. Dinu Pass

3. Release

4. Awakening

5. Black Soldiers

6. Reunion

7. Gloria

8. Incarnation

9. Betrayal

10. Glaeken's Death

11. Talisman

12. The Final Conflict

13. The Evil Within

14. Fisherman's Morning

15. Walking In The Air

 

The Official releases have a track listing like this -

 

1. Gloria´s Theme

2. Ancient Powerplant

3. The Silver Seal

4. Voices from a common land

5. Arx Allemand

6. The Night in Romania

7. Canzone

8. Sign in the dark

9. Weird Village

10. Love and Destiny

11. The Challenger´s Arrival

12. Supernatural Accomplice

13. Parallel Worlds

14. Truth and Fiction

15. Wardays Sunrise

16. Heritage Survival

 

And the bootleg I own has all 16 of the official release tracks PLUS the edition of these 4 -

 

17. South Camora

18. Moorland

19. Silver Scale

20. The Keep (Logos)

 

I don't recognize all the tracks (From TD's Official release + the bootleg) from the film. So I must assume that a lot of this was trimmed from the film version.

It seems that none of the versions out there are complete on their own, but together they likely form a fairly complete score.

Fucking interesting. I'd love to know the story behind this.

 

Anyway, I seem to have all the music now ;)

Cheers.

 

- TB

 

Yeah, I'm not into downloading albums either except for it's hard to find stuff.

 

Hank Williams III - This Ain't Country

Dead Man's Shoes Original Soundtrack

Metallica - Death Magnetic Guitar Hero III version (it sounds so much better than the CD release)

 

 

Regarding The Keep soundtrack, wasn't Mann's original cut of it like 3 hours, so a lot of music must have been cut out.

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I'd love to see a director's cut of The Keep.

The theatrical version has always been the subject of heavy critique.

I saw it in the theater when I was 15 or 16 (my first taste of Ian McKellen).

I went because I was a fan of Scott Glenn and it was a horror film with mystical elements.

I also discovered Gabriel Byrne and Jürgen Prochnow for the first time (much to my delight).

Maybe because I saw it at a young age I didn't necessarily understand it's shortcomings, I just loved it and it's long been a favorite.

And if The Keep is such a failure as a film I'd still take 100 Keeps over the continued crud we see in the genre these days.

One thing I think everyone can agree on is that it's unique.

 

I don't think there has ever been an official studio release of the film on DVD. There are one or more versions available but they look like inferior product to me.

Stuff I've read suggests that they were digitally transferred from TV telecasts. Not interested in that.

 

Hopefully some day we'll see a new print on DVD with some Michael Mann tinkering.

I'd kill to see the full three hours ;)

 

- TB

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I don't know, I've read somethings that have said Mann has no real inclination to go back and revist the movie.

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Well that isn't shocking. He got his ass kicked when it first came out.

It sent him back to TV!

 

Yeah, that's a shame. I believe there is a really fantastic movie in there (all that unseen footage), but I also respect Mann not wanting to go back and revisit the project.

Still, I'd love to see a nice remastered theatrical cut available on DVD. Someday.

 

- TB

 

PS. Arright, back on topic!

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Back on topic, I decided to listen to Dead Man's Shoes soundtrack. Though not technically a score (it has bits of instrumental music throughout), but it is a pretty fucking relaxing album to listen too.

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Back on topic, I decided to listen to Dead Man's Shoes soundtrack. Though not technically a score (it has bits of instrumental music throughout), but it is a pretty fucking relaxing album to listen too.

 

Did you mention before that is not readily available for purchase?

I'd love to hear it.

 

- TB

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