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I Melt With You

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Just saw it. I don't think it's exactly a movie I can watch over and over, but I thought it was very dark and very good.

 

I've read a few really negative reviews, really damning the movie, and that's fine. They have every right to hate it, and in their own way they hit the nail on the head. I personally don't subscribe to the belief that every film or show or book has to have a likable character, a redeeming story, or even something I can identify with. I like stories well told, and I like to be challenged. Some stories are bleak, and just get darker. The Road comes to mind (though while the movie is still depressing as hell, compared to the book it's a cheery Spring afternoon at the park). I look for a quality, sometimes it's the look, or the editing, or in I Melt With You's case, it's the acting. Everyone showed up and swung for the fences, not afraid to try something different.

 

The movie is depression. It's bleak, it's regretful, and it's hopeless. And that's what I liked about. There's no redemption for the characters, none that they were going to achieve. It was a brave choice by all involved to create something so polarizing. Not sure when I'll watch it again, but I'm glad I watched it once.

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Anybody checked out the special features yet? I know the disk comes loaded with interviews and commentaries.

 

Yes I loved the "deleted scenes"...

Too bad they couldn't leave them in.

In hindsight Mark wanted to add a few more.

Could you imagine? I'm sure you could of done a whole lot more with this film and go nuts but it's too bad they had to stick to the minimum.

It was still amazing. With all they had to work with. Very proud of them how this film turned out!

 

We also have to acknowledge how amazing Carla was in her role. She was great!

 

The first day I ordered it -- once it was released.

I tweeted about how much I loved it and Jeremy Piven was so cute. He sent me a DM to find out if I downloaded it or ordered it? LOL

I don't blame him because I know the actors free willingly did these roles and got paid sqwat. I know they wanted to do this for not ever having done a flick "out of the box".

 

Kudos to them!

 

I hope they get the recognition for this film -- it's well deserved! One word -- epic!!!

 

Have you seen them yet? What did everyone think?

 

P.s Poor TJ getting sea sick. I love the sea but I'm the same way...can't handle the waves either!

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Here's the link to a great list about / review of I Melt With You, with an emphasis on Tom for certain parts:

 

"The dialogue in this movie is well written and heavy. Each character is portrayed perfectly."

 

http://listsof.wordpress.com/2012/03/28/7-notable-things-about-i-melt-with-you/

 

Jen

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Thought you folks might enjoy seeing this shot of TJ from I Melt With You. I grabbed this from some of the photo assets sent to me, RE: the posters.

I think it's pretty damn awesome. Not sure how high up this is, but if Tom pokes his head back in here perhaps he can tell us ;)

Not sure who the photographer was. I'll find out who was shooting stills on set. May have been Rob Cowan.

 

Dig

 

MeltJaneTightrope.jpg

 

 

- TB

That is a cool shot but that looks a little to high for my liking.

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I dont think life is shit after 40. It's the same slog it's always been. But the feelings the film explores and and the way they show it, the portrayals are what really moved me. The madness we can find ourselves in from time to time.

I dont think life is shit after 40. It's the same slog it's always been. But the feelings the film explores and and the way they show it, the portrayals are what really moved me. The madness we can find ourselves in from time to time.

Yeah I agree with you life is not shit after 40. I am 44 and yes I have had my ups and downs and I am sure all of us have had some madness in our lives.

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By far, this is my favorite TJ movie. Anyone who hasn't seen it yet, go see it! lol

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Even though I read movie reviews regularly, I never really take them into consideration when deciding to either see or skip seeing a movie. Why? If I did, I’d be missing out on a lot of great movies. For some reason, I decided to avoid reading the reviews for I Melt With You. Even the good ones. Reviews are only opinions, and I wanted to form my own opinion on the film.

 

Mesmerizing. Poignant. Brilliant. Whoa. These are just a few of the words that come to mind while I’m watching I Melt With You and after seeing it. Thomas Jane, Rob Lowe, Jeremy Piven, & Christian McKay truly perform to such an exceptional level in this extraordinary gem. Hats off to Mark Pellington for directing this formidable film that’s an emotional ride from beginning to middle to end!

 

WARNING: IF YOU HAVEN’T SEEN I MELT WITH YOU, STOP READING NOW. SERIOUSLY. SPOILERS! AHEAD.

 

Here’s my LONG REVIEW:

 

I Melt With You is really not just a film about a bunch of buddies getting together and doing drugs. Yes, they do take many drugs. Many, many drugs. But if you dig a little deeper, it’s so much more than that. It’s about friendship. Change. Promises. And not being able to recapture “the past.”

 

The Pact: Suicide is always going to be one of the darkest subjects to tackle. Watching the trailer & Tom’s teaser, I thought they had all committed a murder. I didn’t realize they had agreed to kill themselves until I read the paper, which was signed in blood. I didn’t know they were going to show the paper at the end, so I actually paused the movie in order to read it. I got chills when I read, “We will die as one.”

 

To know how much these guys mean to each other is beautiful. The fact that none of them ever amounted to much in life is heartbreaking. But here’s their pact. Their promise to each other. They were truly dedicated to one another. But where were they when life got tough? How come they had to hide their depression in the eyes of friends? Was it because they were too proud and embarrassed? Ashamed? I guess when they were with each other, they wanted to feel better about themselves. They didn’t want to turn their special gatherings into therapy sessions. Though, by opening up, they would’ve saved their lives.

 

To me, 44 is still young. Age is a number. It’s how you old you feel (a cliché). I know someone who’s in his 60s who has more energy than someone who’s in his 20s. The characters had tons of time to get on the right path and live their dreams. To give up so easily and so early is a huge mistake to make.

 

TIM: I’m not too familiar with Christian McKay, but for my first time seeing him, I’d say it’s a really grand performance. Tim’s life has been consumed by guilt. Instead of being excited to celebrate his birthday, he can only dwell on his troubled past. He looked happy when he was with his friends, which is just a mask he wears around them. He spends a moment with each one of them to see how satisfied they are with their lives. None seem to be living the lives they imagined they’d have or really want to share what’s truly going on in their separate worlds.

 

Tim shares his troubles with two strangers, and the three of them share a night of passion. How come it’s easier for him to open up with people he doesn’t know rather than discuss his problems with the people who have known him for years? Though, you can never fully know a person. My favorite scene of Tim’s is when he shaves, and then cries. Very emotional. And misleading. I thought his shaving meant he was looking to have a fresh start.

 

Of the four, I feel the most anger towards Tim, because he’s the one who sets the pact in motion. However, he doesn’t deserve all the blame. People are in control of their own fates. The others didn’t have to follow his lead; they chose to do so. Was the pact his idea in the first place? I can’t remember if that was mentioned or not.

 

RON: I’ve been a fan of Jeremy Piven’s since I saw him in the Car 54, Where Are You? movie. He’s been my favorite character in anything I’ve seen of his. I love him! And after seeing his Ron in this film, I want to go over and hug it out with him. ;) Seriously. Piven turns in an outstanding performance. He only wants to support his family, but money troubles secretly tear up his picture perfect family.

 

Unlike the rest of the group, he’s not pro-pact. He realizes that people make promises they don‘t plan to keep, and that a piece of paper shouldn’t mean his end just because he signed it in blood as a younger man. He runs off to be with his family. But everyone, including himself, sees it more as him running away. Abandoning his friends. I love when he’s looking in the mirror and he rubs his hands over his face. He doesn’t want to die, but he doesn’t want to be a coward. Those are his only options? That sucks. He decides to return to die as one.

 

So, instead of abandoning his friends, he decides to abandon his family. Really? How is THAT not being a coward? Even when he’s back and thinks he’s going to take his own life, he can’t. He just can’t. He asks Richard to do it for him. Richard, being a good friend, murders Ron. Yes, I know. Ron’s mind wanted it; but his body fought. I don’t think he wanted to die with them. He’s the only one who left. He’s the only one who second-guessed. He’s the only one who didn’t truly have the final say.

 

JONATHAN: The doctor is in! I’ve known Rob Lowe to have acting chops, but dang. He’s GOOD. Plus, he looks amazing in shades. B) Right, ladies? Jonathan’s become a doctor. That’s gotta be a dreamlike profession; he must be satisfied with how his life turned out. Wrong. Cause he’s not only a doctor. No, it only makes sense for him to be a drug dealer, as well. As bad as he feels about having turned his practice into an alley business, that’s not the worst thing in his life. His own son calls his stepfather “Dad.” Ouch!

 

He feels a bit like a loner. He prefers being by himself, maybe because he’s used to it. He walks away from the group to swallow pills in the bathroom. As a leader in the medical profession, he knows about all the harm those drugs do to him; he still doesn’t care. And at the party, he takes a handful of whatever and downs ’em like they don’t mean anything. Almost like he doesn’t care about the high he’ll get from them.

 

Jonathan has to be the one who first finds Tim hanging. He’s scared, as anyone would be, when he sees that his friend has killed himself. He’s screaming and crying, and it hurts to watch him experience this tragedy firsthand. It’s unfathomable.

 

Before he takes his life, he watches clips from a family vacation of him with his son and ex-wife. He sees the happiness he had. See, he had happiness after youth. Even though, he’s not happy at the moment, that doesn’t mean he can’t recapture the joy later in life. He isn’t going to try. He’s the only hardcore druggie in the film who dies by drugs. Ironic.

 

RICHARD: Tom sure likes to play Richards, doesn’t he? He’s an English teacher who had envisioned his life as a successful writer. He’s settling. My heart aches when he’s told he hasn’t accomplished his goal of writing. Isn’t that just the last thing you want to hear, when you haven‘t succeeded? There is lots of emotion in Richard’s eyes. I enjoyed seeing Tom laugh and dance. Turn the music up louder, Richard! ;) Here’s this man who wants to let loose and revel in the moment only to have a friend turn him down. Well, he can’t be turned down. No, he’s going to do what he wants, because he’s so tired of having to settle.

 

It’s so cute seeing him get flirty with young women. He’s proving he’s still got it. And he’s fine with sleeping around with different girls; he doesn’t feel tied down. He doesn’t want to settle (there’s that word, again) down with a woman for the rest of his life. There’s no written rule that says he has to.

 

When he goes and picks a fight, he’s hoping the guy kills him, so he doesn’t have to kill himself. And when he enters and finds Jonathan dead and says aloud that he was going to tell him he couldn’t do it, I thought he wouldn’t do it. Now, I never want to see any of Tom’s characters die, but c’mon. He kills Rob and then visits Jon perfectly after he’s done the horrific deed; he can’t back down now.

 

After burying 3 best friends, Richard freaks out. And it’s completely understandable. He’s passed his breaking point. He turns the walls around him into a canvas of depressing art; he's finally expressing his pain. Carla Gugino’s Officer Boyde finds out she was right about her suspicions. Where are Richard’s friends? They’re all dead. Seeing those burials lined up side by side is haunting.

 

Richard runs from the cop & speeds off. There’s still hope that he’s gonna be the one who lives on. But no. Before we know it, he’s on the edge. Literally. Boyde can’t talk him down. No one can. Not even himself. His reason for dying isn’t just based on the fact that he’s not an established author; he’d miss his friends too much. :(

 

Music: This soundtrack is incredible! Each song adds a unique quality to every scene. Yes! “I Wanna Be Adored” by The Stone Roses made it into the movie! I really…well, I adore this song so much. It’s definitely stuck in my head. All of this music is my kind of music. I love that “Coward” song. I forget. Who sings that one? It just plays beautifully over Ron’s confusion. I wish the DVD came with a mini soundtrack like Henry Poole Is Here did.

 

Cinematography/Imagery: Beautiful and stunning. The lighting sets the mood while the pictures help tell the story. I was on the edge of my seat, because I didn’t want to miss any shot.

 

Here’s the ending: all of the main characters die. Now, how often do you see that happen? Quite daring, I’d say. It’s odd knowing that they took the “die as one” to be that they died at different times rather than driving off a cliff together. Having each character die at a different moment has a more powerful impact. I love hearing the promise read aloud by each of the four friends. That helped give the tragic ending meaning. So, what happens afterwards. I can’t help imagining the reactions of the family and friends this foursome left behind.

 

Ending Credits: I saw Tim Bradstreet’s name!!! Yay!!! :D

 

For those of you who have made it this far in reading my review, thank you! You deserve a gold star! The scary part is I didn’t cover everything I could've.

 

If I ever have the fortunate opportunity of meeting Thomas Jane, Rob Lowe, Jeremy Piven, or Christian McKay, I’ll start applauding them for their hard work & powerful performances in I Melt With You. I promise. B)

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Even though I read movie reviews regularly, I never really take them into consideration when deciding to either see or skip seeing a movie. Why? If I did, I’d be missing out on a lot of great movies. For some reason, I decided to avoid reading the reviews for I Melt With You. Even the good ones. Reviews are only opinions, and I wanted to form my own opinion on the film.

 

Mesmerizing. Poignant. Brilliant. Whoa. These are just a few of the words that come to mind while I’m watching I Melt With You and after seeing it. Thomas Jane, Rob Lowe, Jeremy Piven, & Christian McKay truly perform to such an exceptional level in this extraordinary gem. Hats off to Mark Pellington for directing this formidable film that’s an emotional ride from beginning to middle to end!

 

WARNING: IF YOU HAVEN’T SEEN I MELT WITH YOU, STOP READING NOW. SERIOUSLY. SPOILERS! AHEAD.

 

Here’s my LONG REVIEW:

 

I Melt With You is really not just a film about a bunch of buddies getting together and doing drugs. Yes, they do take many drugs. Many, many drugs. But if you dig a little deeper, it’s so much more than that. It’s about friendship. Change. Promises. And not being able to recapture “the past.”

 

The Pact: Suicide is always going to be one of the darkest subjects to tackle. Watching the trailer & Tom’s teaser, I thought they had all committed a murder. I didn’t realize they had agreed to kill themselves until I read the paper, which was signed in blood. I didn’t know they were going to show the paper at the end, so I actually paused the movie in order to read it. I got chills when I read, “We will die as one.”

 

To know how much these guys mean to each other is beautiful. The fact that none of them ever amounted to much in life is heartbreaking. But here’s their pact. Their promise to each other. They were truly dedicated to one another. But where were they when life got tough? How come they had to hide their depression in the eyes of friends? Was it because they were too proud and embarrassed? Ashamed? I guess when they were with each other, they wanted to feel better about themselves. They didn’t want to turn their special gatherings into therapy sessions. Though, by opening up, they would’ve saved their lives.

 

To me, 44 is still young. Age is a number. It’s how you old you feel (a cliché). I know someone who’s in his 60s who has more energy than someone who’s in his 20s. The characters had tons of time to get on the right path and live their dreams. To give up so easily and so early is a huge mistake to make.

 

TIM: I’m not too familiar with Christian McKay, but for my first time seeing him, I’d say it’s a really grand performance. Tim’s life has been consumed by guilt. Instead of being excited to celebrate his birthday, he can only dwell on his troubled past. He looked happy when he was with his friends, which is just a mask he wears around them. He spends a moment with each one of them to see how satisfied they are with their lives. None seem to be living the lives they imagined they’d have or really want to share what’s truly going on in their separate worlds.

 

Tim shares his troubles with two strangers, and the three of them share a night of passion. How come it’s easier for him to open up with people he doesn’t know rather than discuss his problems with the people who have known him for years? Though, you can never fully know a person. My favorite scene of Tim’s is when he shaves, and then cries. Very emotional. And misleading. I thought his shaving meant he was looking to have a fresh start.

 

Of the four, I feel the most anger towards Tim, because he’s the one who sets the pact in motion. However, he doesn’t deserve all the blame. People are in control of their own fates. The others didn’t have to follow his lead; they chose to do so. Was the pact his idea in the first place? I can’t remember if that was mentioned or not.

 

RON: I’ve been a fan of Jeremy Piven’s since I saw him in the Car 54, Where Are You? movie. He’s been my favorite character in anything I’ve seen of his. I love him! And after seeing his Ron in this film, I want to go over and hug it out with him. ;) Seriously. Piven turns in an outstanding performance. He only wants to support his family, but money troubles secretly tear up his picture perfect family.

 

Unlike the rest of the group, he’s not pro-pact. He realizes that people make promises they don‘t plan to keep, and that a piece of paper shouldn’t mean his end just because he signed it in blood as a younger man. He runs off to be with his family. But everyone, including himself, sees it more as him running away. Abandoning his friends. I love when he’s looking in the mirror and he rubs his hands over his face. He doesn’t want to die, but he doesn’t want to be a coward. Those are his only options? That sucks. He decides to return to die as one.

 

So, instead of abandoning his friends, he decides to abandon his family. Really? How is THAT not being a coward? Even when he’s back and thinks he’s going to take his own life, he can’t. He just can’t. He asks Richard to do it for him. Richard, being a good friend, murders Ron. Yes, I know. Ron’s mind wanted it; but his body fought. I don’t think he wanted to die with them. He’s the only one who left. He’s the only one who second-guessed. He’s the only one who didn’t truly have the final say.

 

JONATHAN: The doctor is in! I’ve known Rob Lowe to have acting chops, but dang. He’s GOOD. Plus, he looks amazing in shades. B) Right, ladies? Jonathan’s become a doctor. That’s gotta be a dreamlike profession; he must be satisfied with how his life turned out. Wrong. Cause he’s not only a doctor. No, it only makes sense for him to be a drug dealer, as well. As bad as he feels about having turned his practice into an alley business, that’s not the worst thing in his life. His own son calls his stepfather “Dad.” Ouch!

 

He feels a bit like a loner. He prefers being by himself, maybe because he’s used to it. He walks away from the group to swallow pills in the bathroom. As a leader in the medical profession, he knows about all the harm those drugs do to him; he still doesn’t care. And at the party, he takes a handful of whatever and downs ’em like they don’t mean anything. Almost like he doesn’t care about the high he’ll get from them.

 

Jonathan has to be the one who first finds Tim hanging. He’s scared, as anyone would be, when he sees that his friend has killed himself. He’s screaming and crying, and it hurts to watch him experience this tragedy firsthand. It’s unfathomable.

 

Before he takes his life, he watches clips from a family vacation of him with his son and ex-wife. He sees the happiness he had. See, he had happiness after youth. Even though, he’s not happy at the moment, that doesn’t mean he can’t recapture the joy later in life. He isn’t going to try. He’s the only hardcore druggie in the film who dies by drugs. Ironic.

 

RICHARD: Tom sure likes to play Richards, doesn’t he? He’s an English teacher who had envisioned his life as a successful writer. He’s settling. My heart aches when he’s told he hasn’t accomplished his goal of writing. Isn’t that just the last thing you want to hear, when you haven‘t succeeded? There is lots of emotion in Richard’s eyes. I enjoyed seeing Tom laugh and dance. Turn the music up louder, Richard! ;) Here’s this man who wants to let loose and revel in the moment only to have a friend turn him down. Well, he can’t be turned down. No, he’s going to do what he wants, because he’s so tired of having to settle.

 

It’s so cute seeing him get flirty with young women. He’s proving he’s still got it. And he’s fine with sleeping around with different girls; he doesn’t feel tied down. He doesn’t want to settle (there’s that word, again) down with a woman for the rest of his life. There’s no written rule that says he has to.

 

When he goes and picks a fight, he’s hoping the guy kills him, so he doesn’t have to kill himself. And when he enters and finds Jonathan dead and says aloud that he was going to tell him he couldn’t do it, I thought he wouldn’t do it. Now, I never want to see any of Tom’s characters die, but c’mon. He kills Rob and then visits Jon perfectly after he’s done the horrific deed; he can’t back down now.

 

After burying 3 best friends, Richard freaks out. And it’s completely understandable. He’s passed his breaking point. He turns the walls around him into a canvas of depressing art; he's finally expressing his pain. Carla Gugino’s Officer Boyde finds out she was right about her suspicions. Where are Richard’s friends? They’re all dead. Seeing those burials lined up side by side is haunting.

 

Richard runs from the cop & speeds off. There’s still hope that he’s gonna be the one who lives on. But no. Before we know it, he’s on the edge. Literally. Boyde can’t talk him down. No one can. Not even himself. His reason for dying isn’t just based on the fact that he’s not an established author; he’d miss his friends too much. :(

 

Music: This soundtrack is incredible! Each song adds a unique quality to every scene. Yes! “I Wanna Be Adored” by The Stone Roses made it into the movie! I really…well, I adore this song so much. It’s definitely stuck in my head. All of this music is my kind of music. I love that “Coward” song. I forget. Who sings that one? It just plays beautifully over Ron’s confusion. I wish the DVD came with a mini soundtrack like Henry Poole Is Here did.

 

Cinematography/Imagery: Beautiful and stunning. The lighting sets the mood while the pictures help tell the story. I was on the edge of my seat, because I didn’t want to miss any shot.

 

Here’s the ending: all of the main characters die. Now, how often do you see that happen? Quite daring, I’d say. It’s odd knowing that they took the “die as one” to be that they died at different times rather than driving off a cliff together. Having each character die at a different moment has a more powerful impact. I love hearing the promise read aloud by each of the four friends. That helped give the tragic ending meaning. So, what happens afterwards. I can’t help imagining the reactions of the family and friends this foursome left behind.

 

Ending Credits: I saw Tim Bradstreet’s name!!! Yay!!! :D

 

For those of you who have made it this far in reading my review, thank you! You deserve a gold star! The scary part is I didn’t cover everything I could've.

 

If I ever have the fortunate opportunity of meeting Thomas Jane, Rob Lowe, Jeremy Piven, or Christian McKay, I’ll start applauding them for their hard work & powerful performances in I Melt With You. I promise. B)

 

Well done my dear ~ best review I have read anywhere!

 

The only thing I would add to your amazing review...is about Ron(Jeremy Piven's character) is that he would rather die than face the music of his family finding out ~ that he will soon be charged with fraud.

 

You're right LIFE doesn't have to end at the age of 44...

But when MEN don't accomplish their dreams and exceed them by the age of 40 and onwards ~ you feel like a failure!

So I understand why Mark wanted to portray this in his film and the fact it's never been done before (through a male's perspective)

is truly brilliant.

 

This is one movie that will leave a mark...regardless if you hated it or not. It's only certain critics that have come down hard on this.

As far as everyone else goes...they all loved it!

 

applause applause!!

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There is something about turning 40, where if you're not "set for life", you feel like you can't start your life over again. You feel like you can't follow a new dream, you can't meet the woman you want to spend your life with, you can't start the family you have dreamed of... You lose hope. The prevaling narrative we are taught is that all of those things should be in place by then. Where are the positive messages for people over 40 who don't have their lives sorted out?

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Even though I read movie reviews regularly, I never really take them into consideration when deciding to either see or skip seeing a movie. Why? If I did, I’d be missing out on a lot of great movies. For some reason, I decided to avoid reading the reviews for I Melt With You. Even the good ones. Reviews are only opinions, and I wanted to form my own opinion on the film.

 

Mesmerizing. Poignant. Brilliant. Whoa. These are just a few of the words that come to mind while I’m watching I Melt With You and after seeing it. Thomas Jane, Rob Lowe, Jeremy Piven, & Christian McKay truly perform to such an exceptional level in this extraordinary gem. Hats off to Mark Pellington for directing this formidable film that’s an emotional ride from beginning to middle to end!

 

WARNING: IF YOU HAVEN’T SEEN I MELT WITH YOU, STOP READING NOW. SERIOUSLY. SPOILERS! AHEAD.

 

Here’s my LONG REVIEW:

 

I Melt With You is really not just a film about a bunch of buddies getting together and doing drugs. Yes, they do take many drugs. Many, many drugs. But if you dig a little deeper, it’s so much more than that. It’s about friendship. Change. Promises. And not being able to recapture “the past.”

 

The Pact: Suicide is always going to be one of the darkest subjects to tackle. Watching the trailer & Tom’s teaser, I thought they had all committed a murder. I didn’t realize they had agreed to kill themselves until I read the paper, which was signed in blood. I didn’t know they were going to show the paper at the end, so I actually paused the movie in order to read it. I got chills when I read, “We will die as one.”

 

To know how much these guys mean to each other is beautiful. The fact that none of them ever amounted to much in life is heartbreaking. But here’s their pact. Their promise to each other. They were truly dedicated to one another. But where were they when life got tough? How come they had to hide their depression in the eyes of friends? Was it because they were too proud and embarrassed? Ashamed? I guess when they were with each other, they wanted to feel better about themselves. They didn’t want to turn their special gatherings into therapy sessions. Though, by opening up, they would’ve saved their lives.

 

To me, 44 is still young. Age is a number. It’s how you old you feel (a cliché). I know someone who’s in his 60s who has more energy than someone who’s in his 20s. The characters had tons of time to get on the right path and live their dreams. To give up so easily and so early is a huge mistake to make.

 

TIM: I’m not too familiar with Christian McKay, but for my first time seeing him, I’d say it’s a really grand performance. Tim’s life has been consumed by guilt. Instead of being excited to celebrate his birthday, he can only dwell on his troubled past. He looked happy when he was with his friends, which is just a mask he wears around them. He spends a moment with each one of them to see how satisfied they are with their lives. None seem to be living the lives they imagined they’d have or really want to share what’s truly going on in their separate worlds.

 

Tim shares his troubles with two strangers, and the three of them share a night of passion. How come it’s easier for him to open up with people he doesn’t know rather than discuss his problems with the people who have known him for years? Though, you can never fully know a person. My favorite scene of Tim’s is when he shaves, and then cries. Very emotional. And misleading. I thought his shaving meant he was looking to have a fresh start.

 

Of the four, I feel the most anger towards Tim, because he’s the one who sets the pact in motion. However, he doesn’t deserve all the blame. People are in control of their own fates. The others didn’t have to follow his lead; they chose to do so. Was the pact his idea in the first place? I can’t remember if that was mentioned or not.

 

RON: I’ve been a fan of Jeremy Piven’s since I saw him in the Car 54, Where Are You? movie. He’s been my favorite character in anything I’ve seen of his. I love him! And after seeing his Ron in this film, I want to go over and hug it out with him. ;) Seriously. Piven turns in an outstanding performance. He only wants to support his family, but money troubles secretly tear up his picture perfect family.

 

Unlike the rest of the group, he’s not pro-pact. He realizes that people make promises they don‘t plan to keep, and that a piece of paper shouldn’t mean his end just because he signed it in blood as a younger man. He runs off to be with his family. But everyone, including himself, sees it more as him running away. Abandoning his friends. I love when he’s looking in the mirror and he rubs his hands over his face. He doesn’t want to die, but he doesn’t want to be a coward. Those are his only options? That sucks. He decides to return to die as one.

 

So, instead of abandoning his friends, he decides to abandon his family. Really? How is THAT not being a coward? Even when he’s back and thinks he’s going to take his own life, he can’t. He just can’t. He asks Richard to do it for him. Richard, being a good friend, murders Ron. Yes, I know. Ron’s mind wanted it; but his body fought. I don’t think he wanted to die with them. He’s the only one who left. He’s the only one who second-guessed. He’s the only one who didn’t truly have the final say.

 

JONATHAN: The doctor is in! I’ve known Rob Lowe to have acting chops, but dang. He’s GOOD. Plus, he looks amazing in shades. B) Right, ladies? Jonathan’s become a doctor. That’s gotta be a dreamlike profession; he must be satisfied with how his life turned out. Wrong. Cause he’s not only a doctor. No, it only makes sense for him to be a drug dealer, as well. As bad as he feels about having turned his practice into an alley business, that’s not the worst thing in his life. His own son calls his stepfather “Dad.” Ouch!

 

He feels a bit like a loner. He prefers being by himself, maybe because he’s used to it. He walks away from the group to swallow pills in the bathroom. As a leader in the medical profession, he knows about all the harm those drugs do to him; he still doesn’t care. And at the party, he takes a handful of whatever and downs ’em like they don’t mean anything. Almost like he doesn’t care about the high he’ll get from them.

 

Jonathan has to be the one who first finds Tim hanging. He’s scared, as anyone would be, when he sees that his friend has killed himself. He’s screaming and crying, and it hurts to watch him experience this tragedy firsthand. It’s unfathomable.

 

Before he takes his life, he watches clips from a family vacation of him with his son and ex-wife. He sees the happiness he had. See, he had happiness after youth. Even though, he’s not happy at the moment, that doesn’t mean he can’t recapture the joy later in life. He isn’t going to try. He’s the only hardcore druggie in the film who dies by drugs. Ironic.

 

RICHARD: Tom sure likes to play Richards, doesn’t he? He’s an English teacher who had envisioned his life as a successful writer. He’s settling. My heart aches when he’s told he hasn’t accomplished his goal of writing. Isn’t that just the last thing you want to hear, when you haven‘t succeeded? There is lots of emotion in Richard’s eyes. I enjoyed seeing Tom laugh and dance. Turn the music up louder, Richard! ;) Here’s this man who wants to let loose and revel in the moment only to have a friend turn him down. Well, he can’t be turned down. No, he’s going to do what he wants, because he’s so tired of having to settle.

 

It’s so cute seeing him get flirty with young women. He’s proving he’s still got it. And he’s fine with sleeping around with different girls; he doesn’t feel tied down. He doesn’t want to settle (there’s that word, again) down with a woman for the rest of his life. There’s no written rule that says he has to.

 

When he goes and picks a fight, he’s hoping the guy kills him, so he doesn’t have to kill himself. And when he enters and finds Jonathan dead and says aloud that he was going to tell him he couldn’t do it, I thought he wouldn’t do it. Now, I never want to see any of Tom’s characters die, but c’mon. He kills Rob and then visits Jon perfectly after he’s done the horrific deed; he can’t back down now.

 

After burying 3 best friends, Richard freaks out. And it’s completely understandable. He’s passed his breaking point. He turns the walls around him into a canvas of depressing art; he's finally expressing his pain. Carla Gugino’s Officer Boyde finds out she was right about her suspicions. Where are Richard’s friends? They’re all dead. Seeing those burials lined up side by side is haunting.

 

Richard runs from the cop & speeds off. There’s still hope that he’s gonna be the one who lives on. But no. Before we know it, he’s on the edge. Literally. Boyde can’t talk him down. No one can. Not even himself. His reason for dying isn’t just based on the fact that he’s not an established author; he’d miss his friends too much. :(

 

Music: This soundtrack is incredible! Each song adds a unique quality to every scene. Yes! “I Wanna Be Adored” by The Stone Roses made it into the movie! I really…well, I adore this song so much. It’s definitely stuck in my head. All of this music is my kind of music. I love that “Coward” song. I forget. Who sings that one? It just plays beautifully over Ron’s confusion. I wish the DVD came with a mini soundtrack like Henry Poole Is Here did.

 

Cinematography/Imagery: Beautiful and stunning. The lighting sets the mood while the pictures help tell the story. I was on the edge of my seat, because I didn’t want to miss any shot.

 

Here’s the ending: all of the main characters die. Now, how often do you see that happen? Quite daring, I’d say. It’s odd knowing that they took the “die as one” to be that they died at different times rather than driving off a cliff together. Having each character die at a different moment has a more powerful impact. I love hearing the promise read aloud by each of the four friends. That helped give the tragic ending meaning. So, what happens afterwards. I can’t help imagining the reactions of the family and friends this foursome left behind.

 

Ending Credits: I saw Tim Bradstreet’s name!!! Yay!!! :D

 

For those of you who have made it this far in reading my review, thank you! You deserve a gold star! The scary part is I didn’t cover everything I could've.

 

If I ever have the fortunate opportunity of meeting Thomas Jane, Rob Lowe, Jeremy Piven, or Christian McKay, I’ll start applauding them for their hard work & powerful performances in I Melt With You. I promise. B)

Good review of it. When I saw it it made me think about my life alot.

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Well done my dear ~ best review I have read anywhere!

 

The only thing I would add to your amazing review...is about Ron(Jeremy Piven's character) is that he would rather die than face the music of his family finding out ~ that he will soon be charged with fraud.

 

You're right LIFE doesn't have to end at the age of 44...

But when MEN don't accomplish their dreams and exceed them by the age of 40 and onwards ~ you feel like a failure!

So I understand why Mark wanted to portray this in his film and the fact it's never been done before (through a male's perspective)

is truly brilliant.

 

This is one movie that will leave a mark...regardless if you hated it or not. It's only certain critics that have come down hard on this.

As far as everyone else goes...they all loved it!

 

applause applause!!

 

Thank you for reading, Paola! Best review you've read anywhere -- Quite a lovely compliment; I'm honored. :D Good call about that add. Actually, there's a lot I could've added about each character.

 

I understand how feeling like a failure can lead to deep depression and suicide. I just wish everyone viewed life as always being worth living no matter what.

 

I love I Melt With You. But I can see how this movie isn't gonna be everyone's cup of tea. I'd love to see I Melt With You become one of those indies that audiences rave about for years to come.

 

There is something about turning 40, where if you're not "set for life", you feel like you can't start your life over again. You feel like you can't follow a new dream, you can't meet the woman you want to spend your life with, you can't start the family you have dreamed of... You lose hope. The prevaling narrative we are taught is that all of those things should be in place by then. Where are the positive messages for people over 40 who don't have their lives sorted out?

 

It's a shame for people to lose hope just because they enter 40 territory. I think a happy life remains a possibility even after 40. Of course, I never agreed with the whole your four years of high school being the best four years of your life notion. Success (personal & professional) can happen at anytime in someone's life. A man could turn 50 and still meet the woman of his dreams ( *cough* Doug Hutchison *cough* ). An ideal life can take many forms. B)

 

Good review of it. When I saw it it made me think about my life alot.

 

Thanks for reading, Joyce! I'm glad you enjoyed it. :)

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http://www.amazon.co.uk/Melt-You-DVD-Thomas-Jane/dp/B00837Z8XG/ref=sr_1_109?s=dvd&ie=UTF8&qid=1337597229&sr=1-109

 

For all us lonely fans in the UK this is now on pre order for UK dvd release on 16th July.

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If you still haven't seen this, it's on Netflix streaming.

 

I think that the theme of this really kinda hits home for anyone who has ever felt like their life isn't where they expected it to be at a certain age. Or that even when it felt like it was okay, something comes along to make you remember all the grand dreams you had for yourself, and how real life got in the way.

 

The extremes that they take, and how they are forced to cover it up and fall like dominos until it winds up on TJ's shoulders... the one that really could have pulled up had he not been pushed to deal with the pact. It's heartbreaking. But I'm a girl, I tend to grasp the emotional aspect of a theme. I fully admit that as a major flaw.

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Okay, this is just too funny not to post, even though the blogger slices 'n' dices the movie... It's basically him and his girlfriend/wife watching the movie and what she's saying interspersed with his inner monologue, or something like that. Here's the link, but only read if you've seen the movie or it will be spoiled for ya, and if you have a sense of humor...:

 

http://www.prettyalltrue.com/2012/05/straight-from-the-bottle/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=straight-from-the-bottle

 

 

Jen

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Links to behind-the-scenes footage from I Melt With You at YouTube:

 

Part 1, where we get to see a shirtless Tom, a cigar-smoking Tom, and a candle-on-tray-holding Tom:

 

and

 

Part 2, where we get to see a shirtless (again!) Tom, a walking-past-graffiti Tom, and the dune tumble:

 

 

Jen

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Gotta say, I wasn't feeling this one. It just did nothing for me.

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Hey Jen, thanks for posting those vids. Really cool.

Those vidoes are really cool. Hey noeland are you staying cool in this heat.

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Sodding UK release pushed back to the 6th Aug now and the artwork is faily standard too 91cdbuw%2BYdL._AA1500_.jpg

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Hahaha, that kinda makes the movie look like a light-hearted little comedy.

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Very dark, too dark. Acting was great, wished there was some hope in the ending.

 

Hope is great, happy endings are cute, but it would have cheated the audience. After all that the character went through, to be the last man standing... there's no way he could just go back to living any kind of life outside of prison...

 

The guilt of having to deal with the deaths of his friends, of being a party to it would have been a miserable way to live in any case.

 

The point was see it as too dark. To face your own life and the differences in your own dreams v. the way your life turned out. To know that that the unwritten hopeful ending is really your own.

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"Hope is great, happy endings are cute, but it would have cheated the audience. After all that the character went through, to be the last man standing... there's no way he could just go back to living any kind of life outside of prison...

 

The guilt of having to deal with the deaths of his friends, of being a party to it would have been a miserable way to live in any case.

 

The point was see it as too dark. To face your own life and the differences in your own dreams v. the way your life turned out. To know that that the unwritten hopeful ending is really your own"

 

 

You are right, the hopeful ending is my own. I suppose if it wasn't so dark I wouldn't look for that tiny ray of hope. I knew he couldn't survive once he killed his friend, I just wished they all weren't so fucked up!

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