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Jason

Whats the salary of a artist(Graphic artist)?

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I just want to know exactly how much you really make a year if anyone works as a artist. In other words Tim lol. But still I just want to know if an artists pay is good and supporting.

 

And also the whole shebang of info on how many years of experience etc. etc.

 

-Jason

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Hey Jason, Just a word of advise here bud. Never ask what anybody else makes for cash in your workplace. Besides the fact it can really tick off some people, bosses totally hate this, and will usually find ways to move this person out of the department if not out of the building.

 

And you should never set YOUR VALUE based on somebody elses value, it just doesn't work. Specially if you were to go up to your boss someday and say, "Hey, I do the same job as Joe but he makes more than me." I'm tellin' ya man, he is already looking for ways to can your butt.

 

The standard answer you'll get for this question will probably be "NOT ENOUGH!"

 

If you talk to your school art instructors, visual imaging instructors they should be able to give you an average salary figure.

 

The honest answer is that "IT ALL DEPENDS ON HOW GOOD YOU ARE" the better you are the more you make.

 

 

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Hey Jason, Just a word of advise here bud. Never ask what anybody else makes for cash in your workplace. Besides the fact it can really tick off some people, bosses totally hate this, and will usually find ways to move this person out of the department if not out of the building.

 

And you should never set YOUR VALUE based on somebody elses value, it just doesn't work. Specially if you were to go up to your boss someday and say, "Hey, I do the same job as Joe but he makes more than me." I'm tellin' ya man, he is already looking for ways to can your butt.

 

The standard answer you'll get for this question will probably be "NOT ENOUGH!"

 

If you talk to your school art instructors, visual imaging instructors they should be able to give you an average salary figure.

 

The honest answer is that "IT ALL DEPENDS ON HOW GOOD YOU ARE" the better you are the more you make.

 

 

Hmm I guess I see what you mean man. Very true. Though I really don't know if being an artist can support someone or even a family thats all ya know? (even though i'm not planning on having a family anytime soon lol)

 

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Guest AdminGuyX
I just want to know exactly how much you really make a year if anyone works as a artist.

 

I don't think anyone is going to tell you how much they make Jason, that's not really something professional people do. It's a little inappropriate to ask people how much money they make too, but I understand it's an honest question.

 

Making a living in the comics industry as a freelancer specifically is a true blue challenge, but making a living as an "artist" is not impossible. There are many ways to ply your trade, use your talent, express yourself, and be financially and artistically satisfied.

 

The term "starving artist" is one of those truisms though ;) if you're not smart about your choices anyway.

 

Comic book publishers pay different rates for different people, for different titles, and it always varies. It depends on everything, the publisher, the project, etc. Certain people can name their own price, and others get offers to take or to leave. It's all negotiable once your work is widely known. If it's not, then generally you're offered a rate for a certain job and you take it or leave it. That's freelance work, and there is generally some negotiations.

 

If you find yourself a fulltime day job doing artwork, as I have been doing for the last 13 years, you're going to be happy. It keeps the bills paid so the freelance work doesn't have to be the bread and butter.

 

You're probably not going to be getting work right out of high school, but that should not stop you from trying. Worrying about getting your work out there to people and offers will come in to you if someone wants to hire you. You just kind of have to take it from there.

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I don't think anyone is going to tell you how much they make Jason, that's not really something professional people do. It's a little inappropriate to ask people how much money they make too, but I understand it's an honest question.

 

Making a living in the comics industry as a freelancer specifically is a true blue challenge, but making a living as an "artist" is not impossible. There are many ways to ply your trade, use your talent, express yourself, and be financially and artistically satisfied.

 

The term "starving artist" is one of those truisms though ;) if you're not smart about your choices anyway.

 

Comic book publishers pay different rates for different people, for different titles, and it always varies. It depends on everything, the publisher, the project, etc. Certain people can name their own price, and others get offers to take or to leave. It's all negotiable once your work is widely known. If it's not, then generally you're offered a rate for a certain job and you take it or leave it. That's freelance work, and there is generally some negotiations.

 

If you find yourself a fulltime day job doing artwork, as I have been doing for the last 13 years, you're going to be happy. It keeps the bills paid so the freelance work doesn't have to be the bread and butter.

 

You're probably not going to be getting work right out of high school, but that should not stop you from trying. Worrying about getting your work out there to people and offers will come in to you if someone wants to hire you. You just kind of have to take it from there.

 

 

Yeah, Irish sort of told me it's kind of inipropriate lol. But still atleat I'm getting to know certain things I didn't know before though, so I don't make a mistake later on.

I do want to get my work out there as much as I can, I still don't know if any comic cons around in florida though, I can start there, also on myspace I can try and figure some things out.

 

Plus here on the RAW boards is a given to show off my work..

Which reminds me.. I should upload some more to show everyone.

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Guest AdminGuyX

Yeah, there are comic cons everywhere. Megacon is in Orlando, Tampa has conventions, Miami does too, but you have to put some work into finding out about them, when and where, and all of that. I think wizard magazine still lists them, and there is also google and yahoo, which I'm sure if you look up "florida comic convention" you're bound to find all manner of stuff close to you.

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Yeah, there are comic cons everywhere. Megacon is in Orlando, Tampa has conventions, Miami does too, but you have to put some work into finding out about them, when and where, and all of that. I think wizard magazine still lists them, and there is also google and yahoo, which I'm sure if you look up "florida comic convention" you're bound to find all manner of stuff close to you.

 

 

Yeah google should defiently have that lol.

 

See I never been to a comic con ya know, Sort of new to comics, Read em once in a while.

usually comic cons have booths from most of the known comic industrys? And If i do go to one of the comic cons, who exactly would I show my portfolio to?

 

 

-Jason

 

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Well, who you show your stuff to depends on the con, but I covered that ground a bit in your other thread about how many people are they hiring. Or I tried to. :)

 

Bigger cons will have the big publishers there, but you may have to travel to those (it's worth it) and smaller cons you might show your work to a guest artist, or an older retired artist (being in Florida and all) and you also have to "consider the source" when you're putting your work out there. From time to time you're going to get a very strange reaction that will make you shake your head and chuckle. And don't be afraid to look at other peoples work, and if come across someone you really dig, someone you've never heard of, don't be afraid to chat them up about how they work. You just never know what you might learn.

 

You have to be open and flexible to the idea of showing your work around too, because someone who draws superheroes will have a very different take than someone who draws fantasy work, etc, etc. That a generalization, I know. You have to take the good with the bad. But trust me, once you have your best work in a portfolio, and your standing in the middle of a convention, you will know who to show it to.

 

Having never been to a comic book con, I'd suggest going to a few without your artwork first to see what they are all about, and to just enjoy yourself without that pressure.

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Well, who you show your stuff to depends on the con, but I covered that ground a bit in your other thread about how many people are they hiring. Or I tried to. :)

 

Bigger cons will have the big publishers there, but you may have to travel to those (it's worth it) and smaller cons you might show your work to a guest artist, or an older retired artist (being in Florida and all) and you also have to "consider the source" when you're putting your work out there. From time to time you're going to get a very strange reaction that will make you shake your head and chuckle. And don't be afraid to look at other peoples work, and if come across someone you really dig, someone you've never heard of, don't be afraid to chat them up about how they work. You just never know what you might learn.

 

You have to be open and flexible to the idea of showing your work around too, because someone who draws superheroes will have a very different take than someone who draws fantasy work, etc, etc. That a generalization, I know. You have to take the good with the bad. But trust me, once you have your best work in a portfolio, and your standing in the middle of a convention, you will know who to show it to.

 

Having never been to a comic book con, I'd suggest going to a few without your artwork first to see what they are all about, and to just enjoy yourself without that pressure.

 

I see what you mean. Though how periodically do these comic cons happen?

 

 

-Jason

 

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I recently read an article in a magazine, about how much money you should charge. An artist needs to know the value of his/her work and then take it from there. The example they gave was that you should charge £200-£600/day, sounds a lot to me (about$400-$1200). But I guess you have to take into account that you might not be working everyday. I spoke to a friend of mine, who has hired professional artists before and he said that one particular uk artist charges £90, $180ish, for an A5 black and white drawing, single figure, no background. I was actually shocked at this, but I guess if you have the talent people will want to pay money.

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